Gadamer's Repercussions: Reconsidering Philosophical Hermeneutics

By Bruce Krajewski | Go to book overview

Chapter 4
Gadamer and Romanticism
ANDREW BOWIE

The contemporary Western philosophical scene can be characterized in terms of divisions and interactions between approaches to philosophy which assume that their task is inextricably linked to the development of the natural sciences and approaches which often regard this assumption with considerable suspicion. Philosophers who adopt the former approach have the obvious advantage that the project of which they see themselves as a part produces more and more results which are in principle—if not in practice—publicly testable and which appear to confirm their underlying assumption that science is converging towards an already constituted reality as it is “in itself”. One disadvantage of this project for its philosophical adherents, however, is that it becomes, as the work of the later Heidegger already suggested, increasingly unclear what its “philosophical” aspect is actually for. As Richard Rorty's remark against representational theories of truth—“Instead of seeing progress as a matter of getting closer to something specifiable in advance, we see it as a matter of solving more problems”— makes clear, it is possible to adopt realist or antirealist assumptions (or neither) as a working scientist (or as a philosopher) without that affecting one's belief in the value of a particular scientific theory; and even if philosophical arguments help in the genesis of theories, this cannot, on pain of circularity, legitimate either the arguments or the theories themselves. 1 Those who suspect the close link between philosophy and natural science, on the other hand, face the evident disadvantage that the explanatory and technical success of the modern sciences seems to render philosophical questions of their kind about the truth generated by those sciences redundant. The advantage they have over their opponents, though, is that even if it is the case that natural science has now developed so far that it does not need philosophy, they can still make appeals to the stubbornly persistent intuition

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Gadamer's Repercussions: Reconsidering Philosophical Hermeneutics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Preface ix
  • Notes xi
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • Introduction - The Task of Hermeneutics as Philosophy 1
  • Notes *
  • Part One - Gadamer's Influence 13
  • Chapter 1 - On Hans-Georg Gadamer's 100th Birthday 15
  • Chapter 2 - Being That Can Be Understood is Language 21
  • Notes *
  • Chapter 3 - An Essay on Gadamer and Levinas 30
  • Notes 50
  • Chapter 4 - Gadamer and Romanticism 55
  • Notes *
  • Chapter 5 - Literature, Law, and Morality 82
  • Notes *
  • Chapter 6 - A Critique of Gadamer's Aesthetics 103
  • Notes *
  • Part Two - Gadamer and Dialogue 121
  • Chapter 7 - To Its Cultured Despisers 123
  • Notes *
  • Chapter 8 - Gadamer's Philosophy of Dialogue and Its Relation to the Postmodernism of Nietzsche, Heidegger, Derrida, and Strauss 145
  • Notes *
  • Chapter 9 - Meaningless Hermeneutics? 158
  • Notes *
  • Part Three - Gadamer in Question 167
  • Chapter 10 - Radio Nietzsche, Or, How to Fall Short of Philosophy 169
  • Notes *
  • Chapter 11 - Hans-Georg Gadamer's Philosophical Interventions Under National Socialism 212
  • Notes *
  • Chapter 12 - A Response to Orozco and Waite 229
  • Notes *
  • Chapter 13 - A Response to Zuckert 244
  • Notes *
  • Chapter 14 - A Response to Zuckert 256
  • Notes *
  • Contributors 307
  • Index 311
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