Natural Conflict Resolution

By Filippo Aureli; Frans B. M. De Waal | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 13
Conflict Management
via Third Parties

Post-Conflict Affiliation of the Aggressor
Marjolijn Das

Introduction

Reconciliation (i.e., affiliation between opponents shortly after an aggressive conflict) has been extensively studied in primates for nearly two decades (de Waal, Chapter 2). The phenomenon of postconflict third-party affiliation (i.e., affiliation between opponents and other group members) has received far less attention. Although de Waal & van Roosmalen described “consolation” (i.e., postconflict affiliation between targets of aggression and third parties) in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) in 1979, it was not until the 1990s that research explicitly focused on post-conflict third-party affiliation. Most of these studies did not investigate the function of post-conflict third-party affiliation but merely demonstrated its occurrence or absence. In this chapter, I discuss post-conflict third-party affiliation involving the aggressor (see Watts et al., Chapter 14, for a discussion on postconflict third-party affiliation involving targets of aggression). The chapter focuses primarily on macaques because most studies of this affiliative behavior have been conducted on these species (Table 13.1). This is a relatively new field of study, and we are still in the phase of formulating working hypotheses for the function of this behavior. The chapter presents an overview of different types of post-conflict third-party affiliation and discusses hypotheses regarding their function with the intention to stimulate thinking and generate directions for future research. Throughout the chapter, the term conflict is used in the meaning of aggressive conflict.

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Natural Conflict Resolution
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - Why Natural Conflict Resolution? 3
  • References *
  • Part I - History 11
  • Introduction 13
  • Chapter 2 - Foundations of Conflict Resolution Research in Animals 15
  • References *
  • Chapter 3 - Conflict Management in Children and Adolescents 34
  • References *
  • Chapter 4 - Searching for Natural Conflict Resolution in Homo Sapiens 54
  • References *
  • Part II - Controlling Aggression 71
  • Introduction 73
  • Chapter 5 - Conflict Management in Various Social Settings 77
  • References *
  • Chapter 6 - Covariation of Conflict Management Patterns Across Macaque Species 106
  • References *
  • Chapter 7 - Coping with Crowded Conditions 129
  • References *
  • Chapter 8 - The Peacefulness of Cooperatively Breeding Primates 155
  • References *
  • Part III - Repairing the Damage 171
  • Introduction 173
  • Chapter 9 - Reconciliation and Relationship Qualities 177
  • References 196
  • Chapter 10 - The Role of Emotion in Conflict and Conflict Resolution 199
  • References 219
  • Chapter 11 - Expanding the Reconciliation Horizon 225
  • References *
  • Chapter 12 - A Multicultural View of Peacemaking Among Young Children 243
  • References *
  • Part IV - Triadic Affairs 259
  • Introduction 261
  • Chapter 13 - Post-Conflict Affiliation of the Aggressor 263
  • References *
  • Chapter 14 - How Targets of Aggression Interact with Bystanders 281
  • References *
  • Part V - Ecological and Cultural Contexts 303
  • Introduction 305
  • Chapter 15 - The Natural History of Valuable Relationships in Primates 307
  • References 327
  • Chapter 16 - Conflict Management in Cross-Cultural Perspective 334
  • References *
  • Chapter 17 - The Evolution and Development of Morality 352
  • References *
  • Conclusion 373
  • Chapter 18 - Shared Principles and Unanswered Questions 375
  • Appendixes 381
  • Appendix A - The Occurrence of Reconciliation in Nonhuman Primates 383
  • References *
  • Appendix B - Key Terms Used in the Volume 387
  • References *
  • Contributors 389
  • Index 391
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