Policing Africa: Internal Security and the Limits of Liberalization

By Alice Hills | Go to book overview

Notes
1
David Bayley, Police for the Future (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1994), 12.
2
Mawby has argued that an international comparative element to specific policing practices is inevitable because of one or more of the four processes: emigration, conquest, joining, and borrowing. See R. I. Mawby, Comparative Policing Issues: The British and American Experience in International Perspective (London: Routledge/Unwin, 1990).
3
Africa Research Bulletin 34: 11 (1997), 12886. SARPCCO can be usefully compared to other regional initiatives such as the Association of Southeast Asian National Police (ASEANPOL). ASEANPOL meets periodically to discuss common concerns (such as organized crime), but it has had little impact on operational policing. The infrequent meetings are restricted and concentrate on the most basic issues permitted by political guidance.
4
Africa Research Bulletin 31: 8 (1995), 11939. Many such agreements now involve South Africa. The lack of contact between South Africa and its neighboring states previously made transborder investigations impossible.
5
Overseas officers visiting the UK are usually more impressed by the independence of a British chief constable and his information technology resources than by the need for financial planning or efficient criminal records systems.
6
The Rapid Intervention Police (RIP, known as Ninjas because of their dark uniforms) were created with Spanish assistance in 1992, in contradiction of the 1991 Bicesse Peace Accords. At the time the government claimed they numbered about 5,850, but the Washington-based Angola Update newsletter refers to the minister of the interior's figure of 30,000 as accurate for 1994 (Angola Update 4: 6 [10 July 1996]). The RIP are, however, police in name only. They receive special forces training and have tanks and helicopters.
7
International Police Review, November/December 1997.
8
Ibid.
9
Even SAPS is particularly weak in its detective services.
10
The phrase war against crime is commonplace, but the language and resources used in South Africa are more meaningfully military, with troops from the Angolan war (such as the Thirty-second Battalion) being deployed in the Johannesburg area. See Financial Times, 31 August 1996.
11
Indian Ocean Newsletter 724 (2 June 1996), 5.
12
Africa Confidential 36: 8 (1995), 7. Traders in Mozambique were not worried about being caught: “If you do get caught, you can buy these guys off. ”
13
Special antidrug programs by SADC member countries can be financed by funds from the Lomé Convention. Indian Ocean Newsletter 691 (28 October 1995), 3. External resources may be provided to promote such goals, but their probable effectiveness is debatable, even when they represent a significant element in the relevant budget.
14
Africa Confidential 36: 2 (1995), 2.
15
Independent on Sunday, 18 January 1998.
16
Kenneth Good, “Accountable to Themselves: Predominance in Southern Africa, ” Journal of Modern African Studies 35: 4 (1997), 554. In contrast, the deputy president, Thabo Mbeki, politicized the situation by arguing that action by former and current security force members loyal to the apartheid regime was the key factor in the crisis.

-84-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Policing Africa: Internal Security and the Limits of Liberalization
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Tables and Figures vii
  • Preface ix
  • Notes xi
  • 1 - Toward a Critique of Policing and National Development in Sub-Saharan Africa Since 1990 1
  • Notes 21
  • 2 - Policing the Postcolonial State 27
  • Notes *
  • 3 - The Police and Politics 55
  • Notes 84
  • 4 - Models of African Policing: Evolution and Conversion 89
  • Notes 111
  • 5 - Models of African Policing:Construction and Integration 115
  • Notes *
  • 6 - Models of African Policing:Transition 139
  • Notes *
  • 7 - Models of African Policing:Adaptation 161
  • Notes *
  • 8 - Conclusion:Modalities of Policing Africa 185
  • Notes *
  • Acronyms 193
  • Bibliography 195
  • Index 207
  • About the Book 213
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 213

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.