Cognition and Chance: The Psychology of Probabilistic Reasoning

By Raymond S. Nickerson | Go to book overview

References

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Cognition and Chance: The Psychology of Probabilistic Reasoning
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Chapter 1 - Probability and Chance 1
  • Chapter 2 - Randomness 54
  • Chapter 3 - Coincidences 82
  • Chapter 4 - Inverse Probability and the Reverend Tnomas Bayes 109
  • Chapter 5 - Some Instructive Problems 143
  • Chapter 6 - Some Probability Paradoxes Ana Dilemmas 181
  • Chapter 7 - Statistics 232
  • Chapter 8 - Estimation Ana Prediction 283
  • Chapter 9 - Perception of Covariation Ana Contingency 332
  • Chapter 10 - Choice Under Uncertainty 355
  • Chapter 11 - People as Intuitive Probabilists 398
  • Chapter 12 - Concluding Comments 436
  • References 439
  • Author Index 489
  • Subject Index 505
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