Diamonds and Coral: Anglo-Dutch Jews and Eighteenth-Century Trade

By Gedalia Yogev | Go to book overview

Chapter 8

The diamond and coral trade at its
zenith 1700-1770

We have seen that the merchants of London consigned to India coral, precious stones, and silver, for the purchase of diamonds. (After 1750 another method was evolved of transferring to India the means needed by the trade: we shall return to this later.) Every year, between November and March, the period preceding the sailing season to India, a group of merchants applied to India House for permission to transport coral, silver, and precious stones to India for the purchase of diamonds. After 1720 the handling of these applications became a matter of routine. Rarely was any limitation imposed. In 1755 Moses Montefiore was allowed to export a quantity of coral on condition that there was enough shipping space, and a similar condition was attached to all licences issued that year and again in 1760. 1 Generally there was no need for such a qualifying clause because ships used to sail to India half empty. In this respect too the coral-diamond trade fitted in well with the interest of the Company — the bulky coral was taken on the outward journey, when ships had space enough to spare, while the diamonds, taken on the return journey, when ships were fully laden, presented no problem of storage. Normally the applications were approved without exception, and the names of the exporters and the contents of the licences were registered in the minute books of the Court of Directors. After receiving the licence, the exporter paid the usual fees and sent his goods or silver to India House in Leadenhall Street. There they were examined and sealed and the sign of the exporter — often consisting of his initials enclosed by a Shield of David — was put on the boxes. 2 The consignments were then loaded on East Indiamen which sailed to India in early spring, arriving there during the summer.

The coral needed for the India trade was usually bought at Leghorn; often it was the property of Leghorn merchants who sent it to India through their agents at London. Consignments

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Diamonds and Coral: Anglo-Dutch Jews and Eighteenth-Century Trade
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 360

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.