Catching Dreams: My Life in the Negro Baseball Leagues

By Frazier Robinson; Paul Bauer | Go to book overview

9
Too Old to Play, Too Young to Retire

After the 1953 season, at the age of 43, I decided I was old enough to hang it up. I'd noticed during the season that I just didn't have the energy that I once had, so I decided to finish the season and not try to come back. I went back to Cleveland and got me a job at General Aluminum. At first they started me working with motors, then I got a job inspecting castings.

To tell you the truth, that job was the hardest thing to adjust to. Not that I was afraid of hard work, but it hadn't been that long since I could walk down the street in Baltimore and overhear people say, "There goes Robinson. He catches for the Elites." People knew me. And then it seemed like the next thing I knew, there I was in Cleveland, just another working man, and no spring training to look forward to. At first that really bothered me but later on I figured that's just the way it has to be. I can't do nothing about it. I can't change it.

When I was looking to retire from baseball, I thought I'd get into some kind of business, and I would have if I could have found the right person to go into business with. Then maybe I could have gone and done all right in business. As it was, I never did find nobody that I could trust that much so business was out. Of course, a job in baseball was out too. They didn't have jobs for black coaches. John O'Neil got a coaching job, but he was the only one.

Buck wound up scouting for the Chicago Cubs for a long time. He sent Ernie Banks up. And Gene Baker. Baker and Banks. Bingo and Bango. They both went to the Cubs in 1953 and became the first black double

-185-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Catching Dreams: My Life in the Negro Baseball Leagues
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • About the Author vi
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction: - Freedom and Fate, Baseball and Race xv
  • 1 - Back Where It All Began 1
  • 2 - Satchel Paige's All-Stars 21
  • 3 - The Kansas City Monarchs 51
  • 4 - From Kansas City to Baltimore and Back Again 77
  • 5 - War 98
  • 6 - The Color Line Falls 103
  • 7 - A Ballplayer's Life 128
  • 8 - Canada 165
  • 9 - Too Old to Play, Too Young to Retire 185
  • 10 - The Hall of Fame 209
  • Index 215
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 230

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.