Recording Conceptual Art: Early Interviews with Barry, Huebler, Kaltenbach, Lewitt, Morris, Oppenheim, Siegelaub, Smithson, and Weiner

By Alexander Alberro; Patricia Norvell | Go to book overview
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INTRODUCTION
AT THE THRESHOLD OF
ART AS INFORMATION
ALEXANDER ALBERRO

The type of art that I'm involved with and concerned about has to do less with materiality than ideas and intangible considerations.

SETH SIEGELAUB, APRIL 17, 1969

What is the least amount of presentation that I can get away with?

ROBERT BARRY, MAY 30, 1969

I don't sell the commodity. I sell the idea.

SOL LefiITT, JUNE 12, 1969

Art is not necessarily a visual experience.

DOUGLAS HUEBLER, JUNE 25, 1969

Among the many provocative ideas advanced by the eleven artists Patricia Norvell interviewed in early 1969, one of the most problematic, though in retrospect clearly prescient, is the only apparently humble reduction of the role of the artist to that of a mere catalyst for processes of producing art. In particular Robert Morris, under whose direction Norvell conducted the interviews for her master of arts thesis in studio arts at Hunter College, maintains this tenet. 1 Morris explains his general philosophy or method of working in the late 1960s to Norvell as one where

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