Recording Conceptual Art: Early Interviews with Barry, Huebler, Kaltenbach, Lewitt, Morris, Oppenheim, Siegelaub, Smithson, and Weiner

By Alexander Alberro; Patricia Norvell | Go to book overview

7
SOL LefiITT
JUNE 12, 1969

PATRICIA NORVELL: First, could you talk about what you're doing now?

SOL LefiITT: Well, now, I'm working on wall-drawings and drawings on paper and drawings on three-dimensional pieces. How did I start to do them? Well, it's kind of the end of a process which … I was doing and I still do three-dimensional things. And … well, it started this way: I did a serial kind of system of three-dimensional cubes. And after I did them, I wanted to do a set of drawings concerning them which would become a book—which has become a book. And in order to do these drawings I had to devise a method to show that some boxes were open and some boxes were closed. So I used parallel lines as, in this case, a description of three-dimensional form on two dimensions.

Then someone proposed the project of a “Xerox Book”—it was Seth Siegelaub—and he said he wanted twenty-five pages. Well, since I had already been thinking about drawing, because that was the last thing that I'd been doing, I decided that I would do a series of drawings [see figure 24]. And what I did I took— since there were twenty-five pages—I took the number twenty-four and there's twenty-four ways of expressing the numbers one, two, three, four. And I assigned one kind of line to one, one to two, one to three, and one to four. One was a vertical line, two was a horizontal line, three was diagonal left to right, and four was

-112-

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Recording Conceptual Art: Early Interviews with Barry, Huebler, Kaltenbach, Lewitt, Morris, Oppenheim, Siegelaub, Smithson, and Weiner
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Illustrations vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Introduction - At the Threshold of Art as Information 1
  • Notes *
  • Introduction to Eleven Interviews 17
  • Note on the Interviews 19
  • 1 - March 29, 1969 21
  • Note *
  • 2 - April 17, 1969 31
  • Notes *
  • 3 - May 16, 1969 56
  • Notes *
  • 4 - May 24, 1969 70
  • Note *
  • 5 - May 30, 1969 86
  • Notes *
  • 6 - June 3, 1969 101
  • Notes *
  • 7 - June 12, 1969 112
  • Note *
  • 8 - June 20, 1969 124
  • 9 - July 25, 1969 135
  • Notes *
  • Index 155
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