Collision Course: The Strange Convergence of Affirmative Action and Immigration Policy in America

By Hugh Davis Graham | Go to book overview

6
The Strange Convergence of Affirmative
Action and Immigration Policy

I n the early 1990s, when a sharp recession increased unemployment and threatened job security throughout the United States, newspapers began publishing stories about immigrants participating in affirmative action programs. 1 The issue was especially controversial in cities with large immigrant populations, such as Chicago, Houston, Los Angeles, Miami, New York, and Washington, D.C. Civil rights leaders, anxious to protect affirmative action programs from criticism, avoided discussing the issue, as did immigrant rights leaders. Government officials responsible for affirmative action programs, unable to avoid comment, generally reiterated agency guidelines on eligibility, a response which affirmed, often in obfuscating bureaucratese, that immigration status was generally not relevant to affirmative action eligibility.

These stonewalling strategies by beneficiary groups and agency officials were often successful in deflecting criticism and sidetracking the issue. Affirmative action programs were a confusing mix of federal and local, public and private, court-ordered and agency-mandated. Journalists were rarely able to ferret out specific information about how many immigrants were benefiting from which programs. Larger issues, moreover, dominated the news in the early 1990s: the end of the cold war, the winning of the Persian Gulf hot war, the Bush-Clinton-Perot presidential contest, the controversies over national health care insurance and gays in the military, the Republican sweep of Congress in 1994. Affirmative action for immigrants was an emotion-laden issue, especially during recession, but it was not generally a page-one news item. Resentment of immigrants, though strong in the heavy immigration states of Arizona, California, Florida, Illinois, New York, and Texas, was not a powerful grassroots force in most other states. 2

-131-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Collision Course: The Strange Convergence of Affirmative Action and Immigration Policy in America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Preface and Acknowledgments ix
  • Collision Course xi
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - Civil Rights Reform in the 1960s 13
  • 3 - Immigration Reform in the 1960s 35
  • 4 - Origins and Development of Race-Conscious Affirmative Action 65
  • 5 - The Return of Mass Immigration 93
  • 6 - The Strange Convergence of Affirmative Action and Immigration Policy 131
  • 7 - Conclusion 165
  • Notes 201
  • Index 229
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 246

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.