Flares of Memory: Stories of Childhood during the Holocaust

By Anita Brostoff; Sheila Chamovitz | Go to book overview

IX
Emergence into Light

A paradox: these are stories about the end of the war, about the liberation of prisoners and hidden people; yet they arouse deep sadness and empathy. The writers here express their exaltation at the moment of their liberators' arrival; yet as they are freed from the torments of their individual hells, they are haunted by these hells and at the same time flung into a trough of new troubles and anguish.

From the middle of 1944 through early 1945, Allied armies were closing in on the Germans and arriving at the concentration camps. The Soviets moved in from the east, while the British and Americans came from the west. In the Soviet Union, where the Germans had invaded, the Germans were caught by advancing Soviet troops and were retreating back toward Germany. In all areas, as the Germans understood that the war was lost, they and their collaborators brutally tried to finish the task of the Final Solution—to kill as many Jews as they could. They also attempted to hide the evidence of the Holocaust by evacuating and destroying the concentration camps. But since they still needed the slave labor that the prisoners supplied, they tried to move many camp inmates, by death marches and trains, into central Germany.

For the victims who had survived to the end of the war, then, the troubles posed by freedom took several forms. Survivors faced the practical problems of where to go and how to live. Thrust suddenly into the countryside, often in a foreign land, they had no homes—frequently no towns—left to go to. Their families were at best dispersed, more likely dead. They had no money and no means of subsistence. Alone, clothed in rags, without resources, lost in a landscape where local people were as anti-Semitic as ever—the survivors were faced with the task of picking up the pieces when there were no pieces to pick up.

As terrible as the physical problems were, the most traumatic aspects of liberation for survivors were often psychological. The wild emotional content of this period of time is expressed movingly in “The Golden Chain of Judaism.” This series of stories about a young girl emerging from hiding recounts ups and downs of finding a place for oneself, and of life in the displaced persons camps. The stories prophecy both the Jews' profound elation over the survival of Judaism itself, and their inability to forget or outlive the horrors of what they endured.

-225-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Flares of Memory: Stories of Childhood during the Holocaust
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 344

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.