Understanding Storytelling among African American Children: A Journey from Africa to America

By Tempii B. Champion | Go to book overview

Preface

This book reports research on narrative production among African American children for the purpose of extending previous research and discussion of narrative structure. Some researchers studying narrative production among African American children have focused on the influence of culture on the narrative structures employed. Some researchers (e.g., Michaels, 1981; Heath, 1983; Gee, 1985) have suggested that narrative structure is strongly influenced by home culture. Other researchers (Hyon & Sulzby, 1994; Hicks & Kanvesky, 1992) have suggested that the narrative structures produced are not necessarily affiliated with the home culture of the child. They find that African American children, like children in general, often produce narrative structures typically found in school settings.

The research in this book extends previous research on narrative structures produced by African American children by suggesting that African American children do not produce one structure of narratives exclusively, as previously reported. My research suggests that African American children produce a repertoire of narrative structures. Some of the narrative structures found appear to have links to African and African American narrative structures, whereas other structures are similar to European American narrative structures.


Overview of the book

Chapter 1 provides an introduction to the book. Areas covered in this chapter include the history of storytelling within the African American community, transformation from African to African American, African American English language studies, narrative analysis and purpose of thebook. The book is divided into three parts.

Part 1, “Approaches to Understanding Narrative Structures Among African American Children”(chapters 2 -4 of the book) provides a framework for understanding narrative structures among African American children. Chapter 2 presents an overview of research narrative structures among African Americans and West Africans. The African and African American cultures have a rich oral tradition within oral storytelling strategies. In chapter 3, I present the research design and procedures of the study presented in this book, and address how the study builds on and extends the research on narrative production among African American children. Because my perspective values the culture and social processes in which children develop, a mixed research designed was employed.

Part 11, Toward a Repertoire of Narrative Structures Among African American Children (chapters 5 -7), provides evidence that African American children pro-

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Understanding Storytelling among African American Children: A Journey from Africa to America
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 135

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.