Understanding Storytelling among African American Children: A Journey from Africa to America

By Tempii B. Champion | Go to book overview

PART II
Toward a Repertoire of Narrative Structures
Among African American Children

The purpose of this Part II of the book is to provide evidence that African American children produce a repertoire of narrative structures that are complex in nature. The narratives that were produced by the children in this study suggest speculatively that they may be linked to African American culture, and possibly to West African culture.

In the following chapters, I present four different analyses. Although it would appear that the results should be parallel, they are not, because the analyses focus on different elements within the narratives. In the first two chapters (Chapters 4 and 5), evaluative and episodic analyses are presented. Both of these approaches are a priori and consider elements within the narratives. Analyzing narratives for only their linear structure may tend to identify “deficits” or “what's missing” in children. A narrative analysis must go beyond examining the structural coherence of a text. For a broader interpretation of a narrative, it is important that children's cultural and social practices be taken into account (Champion, 1998; Champion, Katz, Muldrow &a Dail, 1999).

By viewing narratives as a social practice, one can examine how narrators not only tell about the past, but also negotiate present and future events. When examining the contexts in which narrators tell particular narratives to particular listeners, one must take a different position than simply one that rests on an a priori, hierarchical scheme such as the one reflected in the evaluative and episodic analyses where, for example, leapfrogging and the reactive sequence are on the lower end of the hierarchical scheme.

Previous findings in the leapfrogging and reactive categories has led me to consider using thematic and sociolinguistic analyses. Within the sociolinguistic analysis, I also examined the children's narratives by comparing them to discourse strategies and structures traditionally found in African and African American communities.

The first two chapters of Part II examine narratives using two traditional psycholinguistic analyses. In chapter 4, results are reported using evaluative analysis. The participants in this study produced the classic structure most frequently. In chapter 5, the episodic analysis yielded similar results, with complex structure: being produced most often. Chapter 6 presents results using thematic and some aspects of West African narrative strategies to analyze narratives. These narratives have been coded as “moral centered. ” In chapter 7, narratives are coded as “performative” using thematic and sociolinguistic analyses.

-42-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Understanding Storytelling among African American Children: A Journey from Africa to America
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 135

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.