Understanding Storytelling among African American Children: A Journey from Africa to America

By Tempii B. Champion | Go to book overview

Subject Index
Action sequences 56
African American English Language Studies 6
African to African American 5
Chronological Structure 45
Classic Structure 44
Complete Episodes 53
Complex Episodes 52
Conclusion 96
Culturally Relevant Pedagogy 90
Data Analysis 36
Data Transcription, and Reliability 34
Description of Utterances 40
Directions for Future Research 96
Discourse Strategies within the African American Community 19
Elements Within Narrative Structure 50
Ending-at-the-Highpoint Structure 48
Episodic Analysis 38
Evaluative Analysis 36
Examples of Narrative Instruction 91
Findings of the study 87
Grammar 110
History of Storytelling Within the African American Community 1
Home-School Mismatch 88
Impoverished Structure 48
Interactive Episodes 55
Intonation and Prosody 112
Leapfrogging Structure 46
Linguistic Features of African American English
Making a Transcript 40
Narrative Analysis 6
Narrative Data Collection Process 35
Narrative Strategies Within West Africa 21

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