Crossing Over: Teaching Meaning-Centered Secondary English Language Arts

By Harold M. Foster | Go to book overview

chapter FOURTEEN
SECTION TWO: Resources: The Fundamentals,
Plans, and Terms

Three Sample Unit Plans

Introduction

This chapter contains three unit plans for activities that are described in earlier chapters. The first plan is for the performance based teaching of A Midsummer Night's Dream described in Chapter Five. The second plan is based on the teaching of poetry found in Chapter Six. Finally, you will find here an extensive unit plan for the teaching of To Kill a Mockingbird found in Chapter Seven.

Although these plans are similar to the activities found in the stories, they are not identical. These plans vary from the stories because plans and teaching are two crafts of a profession and they seldom match completely. However, what you have here are the professional statements that teachers prepare to describe the act of teaching.

Each of these plans begins with goals and objectives that state their purpose and the student learning that will take place. Each of these plans has the outlines of activities that describe what will go on in the classrooms. Also, each of these plans explains how students will be evaluated.

All of these plans describe varied and complicated language arts activities. Therefore, each unit contains large amounts of reading, writing, speaking, and, in at least two plans (To Kill a Mockingbird and A Midsummer Night's Dream), viewing.

Each unit ends with a description of how the plan fulfills the CORE Strategy: Connections, Ownership, Response, Extensions.

As with all of Crossing Over, this section is meant as a baseline illustration of how teachers plan, but in no way represents your final or only option. These plans are here to serve as models for you to reflect on and as scaffolds for you to consider when you build your own classroom plans.

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