Crossing Over: Teaching Meaning-Centered Secondary English Language Arts

By Harold M. Foster | Go to book overview

Appendix
Crossing Over: A Guide
to Personal Writing

Introduction
Use this section as a way of discovering through writing your direction as an English teacher. Do you see yourself as a meaning-centered teacher? Or do you approach English in a different way? You might benefit by writing your own Crossing Over if:
You are training to become an English teacher and are beginning to develop a viewpoint and need to see in writing what you feel, know, and need to learn.
You are a new teacher and would like to know where your early experiences in teaching are leading you.
You are a veteran teacher and would like to have a written review of where you came from and, perhaps, a plan for where you are going.

Where This Book Began

It is October 8, 2:55 Pacific Time. I am in the outdoor eating area of Vista Grande Elementary School in El Cajon, on a beautiful, sunlit, California day, waiting for Lizzy and Jane to end their school day. As I begin the writing of whatever this will become, I need to reflect a little on immediate past events and some not-so-immediate past events. I think I know the subject and know it well, for the subject is me, like no other piece I have written before, and it is about these kids in front of me as I await my daughters, and it is for their teachers. It is about books, magazines, records, newspapers, television, videos, telephones, and computers, and talk, listening, and thought processing. It is about the

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