The Souls of Black Folk: One Hundred Years Later

By Dolan Hubbard | Go to book overview

Anna Julia Cooper, Pauline Elizabeth Hopkins, and the
African American Feminization of Du Bois' Discourse
Barbara McCaskill

I

Woman, Mother, —your responsibility is one that might make angels tremble andfear to take hold! To trifle with it, to ignore or misuse it, is to treat lightly the most sacredandsolemn trust ever confidedby Godto human kind. The training of children is a task on which an infinity of weal or woe depends. Who does not covet it?1

At the turn of the century, it cannot be disputed that, alongside W. E. B. Du Bois and other African American male luminaries, African American clubwomen andopinion leaders (such as Anna Julia Cooper quotedabove) were codefenders of an insouciant nationalist program. Defined by the Pan-African Conference of 1900, Du Bois's nationalism assertedthat there were cultural distinctions that united peoples of African descent across geographical, national, andlinguistic borders. He stoppedshort, however, of attempting to implement a separate African American nation-state. Writing on the construction of African American identity, Judith Stein states that Du Bois's nationalism at this time was not dominated by eschatologies of a separate African statehood. Rather, he assigned “a moral and metaphysical significance” to the idea of nation-building on the basis of

I am grateful for a Fall Quarter 1994 Sarah H. Moss Fellowship from the University of Georgia, which enabledme to travel to research issues of the A.M.E. Church Review at Howard University's Moorland-Spingarn Research Center. With a 1989 Summer Faculty Research Awardfrom the State University of New York–Albany, I visitedFisk University for Pauline Hopkins's manuscripts.

____________________
1
Anna Julia Cooper, “Womanhooda Vital Element in the Regeneration andProgress of a Race, ” in A Voice from the South: By a Black Woman of the South (1892; reprint, New York: Oxford University Press, 1988), 22.

-70-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Souls of Black Folk: One Hundred Years Later
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 341

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.