The Souls of Black Folk: One Hundred Years Later

By Dolan Hubbard | Go to book overview

Index
Italicized page numbers indicate photographs.
abolitionists, northern: revolt andradicalism by, 260
Abrahams, Peter, 3
“Address to the Slaves of the United States of America” (Garnet), 264
Adell, Sandra, 100–101
Adler, Alfred, 224–25, 234
Aeneid (Vergil), 286
aesthetics: Kant's theory of, 305–6; morality and, 312. See also sublime
Africa (Douglas), 186, 187
African Americans: as American and Negro, 134–35. See also double consciousness; self-representation; terms under black; terms under Negro
African arts: aesthetic of, 180; Crisis publication of, 180–81; training for, 172, 173. See also Douglas, Aaron; Tanner, Henry O.
African culture, 11; black churches and, 255; black communicative modes and, 253–54; double consciousness and, 251–52; Du Bois on, 181, 244; stories and songs of, 259. See also “American Negro” photographs
Africans: European philosophers' view of, 301; Western image of, 299–300
African worldview: black churches and, 254–55; Du Bois on, 256–57; interactive black communication and, 256; traditional, 254. See also black and coloredworld
Afrocentric Idea, The (Asante), 266
“Afterthought” (Souls),124, 161, 165–66
Against Racism (Aptheker), 293
Albany Movement, 47
alert songs, as communication devices, 278
Alexander, Daniel, 53
Alexander, Elizabeth, 204
Alexandria, Tenn., 49–69; antebellum, 53 –54; Black Fair, 54; East View Cemetery, 55, 66, 67; growth in, 54–55; “jaunty board” schoolhouse, 62; migration from, 57–58; Mt. Zion Missionary Baptist Church, 55, 69; opportunity for blacks in, 55–57; RosenwaldSchool for Negroes, 57, 63, 64; Seay Methodist Church, U.S.A., 55, 65, 69; town square, 59, 60; Walker's Chapel Primitive Baptist Church, 55, 68, 69. See also “Black Belt”; Wheeler School for Blacks
Allen, William, 270–71, 273
A.M.E. Church Review,83
American discourse, 12. See also double consciousness
“American Negro in Art, The” (Tanner), 175
“American Negro” photographs: composition of, 195–96; as middle-class family albums, 197–98, 214–15; middle-class person as negro criminal, 194–95; paired portraits of, 191, 197, 198–99, 208–9, 212–13; passing of blacks as whites, 196–97; photographer for, 190n3; “productive look” at, 207; reflecting on whiteness, 199; as visual paradigm of double consciousness, 190; white-looking, 200–202, 205, 206, 217
American South: African American population 1900, 40 (chart); culture and consciousness of, 10–11; farm owners andoperators in, 43–44, 44 (chart); race relations, 14; radical expressive mode by blacks in, 259–60; as site of Negro

-331-

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