Jefferson Davis, Unconquerable Heart

By Felicity Allen | Go to book overview

Editorial Note

Emendations
In allowing Davis and his contemporaries to speakfor themselves, it has been my intention to present quotations in as clear and faithful a form as possible. Thus, original spelling, punctuation, and any lapses in grammar are reproduced here. Terminal punctuation has been added when necessary. In some cases editorial intervention has been required to avoid causing confusion or to provide essential information to the reader.
Davis Residences
In the long history of Davis's life, a number of residences are referred to. This list may be an aid to clarity:
1. Poplar Grove or Rosemont. The Jeff Davis boyhood home, a family farm established by his parents in 1811, about a mile and a half from Woodville, Mississippi, in Wilkinson County; kept in the family through Davis's sister Lucinda (Mrs. William Stamps) and her heirs until 1901; owned by Henry Johnson family until 1972; now open under private ownership as a place of historic pilgrimage.
2. Brierfield. Plantation with its house, first built by Davis in 1838, at Davis Bend (now Davis Island) on the Mississippi River, some twentyfive miles south of Vicksburg; home to him and Varina until 1861; seized by Union troops in 1863; subsequently returned to the Davis family; possession regained by Davis himself in 1881; never again his home, but frequently visited by him until his death in 1889; sold by Davis heirs in 1953; now a private hunting preserve; house burned 1931.
3. The Hurricane. Plantation and home of Davis's eldest brother, Joseph Emory, adjoining Brierfield; house burned by Union forces,

-xix-

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Jefferson Davis, Unconquerable Heart
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Editorial Note xix
  • Jefferson Davis - Unconquerable Heart *
  • I - Capture 1
  • II - Home 31
  • III - School 45
  • IV - Army 57
  • V - Marriage 83
  • VI - Plantation and Politics 111
  • VII - Fame 137
  • VIII - United States Senator 159
  • IX - Victory in Defeat 184
  • X - War Department Days 202
  • XI - Struggles for Health and the South 225
  • XII - President 266
  • XIII - The Chief Executive 292
  • XIV - Commander in Chief 317
  • XV - The Year of Our Lord 1863 344
  • XVI - Double-Quick Downhill 372
  • XVII - Prisoners 412
  • XVIII - An Unseen Hand 434
  • XIX - Varina 461
  • XX - Sad Wandering 488
  • XXI - The Cause 511
  • XXII - The Hero 534
  • XXIII - Afterward 560
  • Appendix A - J. E. Johnston to J. Davis, on Rank 577
  • Appendix B - Proclamations by Davis for Days of Prayer 582
  • Appendix C - Devotional Material Used by Davis in Prison 584
  • Preface to the Notes 587
  • Notes 593
  • Select Bibliography 733
  • Index 761
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