Jefferson Davis, Unconquerable Heart

By Felicity Allen | Go to book overview

Preface to the Notes

Sources for facts, and even opinions, are here. Direct quotations are designated “quot.” or “quots.” Books, articles, and manuscripts are identified at first use, with full data in the bibliography. If the use is only incidental, full data is in the pertinent note. “Text, ” “page, ” and “Note” always refer to this work, “p.” and “n.” to others, except in “Ed. Note” and “Descr. Note.”

Short titles that are not mere truncations are listed in abbreviations below, as are code names for frequently used items. For example, “Rowland” stands for Dunbar Rowland's ten volumes of letters, papers, and speeches,Jefferson Davis, Constitutionalist (his other works are under “D. Rowland, ” to distinguish from those of his wife, Eron, “E. Rowland”); “Rosenstock” for the Jefferson Davis Book Collection, Old Capitol Museum of Mississippi History, Mississippi Department of Archives and History (purchased from Fred Rosenstock);Memoir for [Varina Howell Davis]Jefferson Davis, Ex-President of the Confederate States of America: A Memoir by his Wife.

The Papers of Jefferson Davis (Papers), variously edited and still in progress, uses marginal numbers for each item in volumes 1 and 2, with volume and item joined by a colon (also revised edition of 1 and reprint of 2). Publishing practice has since adopted the same device to join volume and page, which Papers uses after volume 2 (so, in this text, Papers 3:5 means volume 3, page 5). To avoid confusion, I add an extra colon between volume and item number in Papers 1 and 2 (Papers 2::5 means volume 2, item 5), and where needed, use “p.” to designate page within the item. The single colon is used before unnumbered parts of 1 and 2, like Appendix (Papers 1:App. 4).

Davis made notes in Prison Life of Jefferson Davis by John J. Craven (1866), always the primary source for this subject, but they were not fully published until 1987, by Edward K. Eckert, in “Fiction Distorting Fact”: The Prison Life, Annotated by Jefferson Davis (here, “Eckert”), providing a new primary source. Every page cited in these notes from Craven has been checked in Eckert for Davis's comments; no reference means no comment. Eckert forces reevaluation of Prison Life by denying Craven's authorship and calling it a “creative fantasy” of Charles G.

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Jefferson Davis, Unconquerable Heart
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Editorial Note xix
  • Jefferson Davis - Unconquerable Heart *
  • I - Capture 1
  • II - Home 31
  • III - School 45
  • IV - Army 57
  • V - Marriage 83
  • VI - Plantation and Politics 111
  • VII - Fame 137
  • VIII - United States Senator 159
  • IX - Victory in Defeat 184
  • X - War Department Days 202
  • XI - Struggles for Health and the South 225
  • XII - President 266
  • XIII - The Chief Executive 292
  • XIV - Commander in Chief 317
  • XV - The Year of Our Lord 1863 344
  • XVI - Double-Quick Downhill 372
  • XVII - Prisoners 412
  • XVIII - An Unseen Hand 434
  • XIX - Varina 461
  • XX - Sad Wandering 488
  • XXI - The Cause 511
  • XXII - The Hero 534
  • XXIII - Afterward 560
  • Appendix A - J. E. Johnston to J. Davis, on Rank 577
  • Appendix B - Proclamations by Davis for Days of Prayer 582
  • Appendix C - Devotional Material Used by Davis in Prison 584
  • Preface to the Notes 587
  • Notes 593
  • Select Bibliography 733
  • Index 761
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