The Jews of the United States, 1654 to 2000

By Hasia R. Diner | Go to book overview

6
AT HOME AND BEYOND
1924–1948

The quarter century between 1924 and 1948 proved to be one of the most momentous periods in Jewish history. It raised wrenching questions about the future of the Jews and severely tested the proposition that real emancipation would be possible and that modernity would mean true integration for the Jews. In this relatively short period European Jews experienced an unprecedented escalation of antiSemitism in the countries that had been cut out of the patchwork quilt of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, including Poland, Hungary, and Czechoslovakia. They endured the rise of National Socialism in Germany in 1933 and later the devastating loss of 6 million Jews at the hands of the Nazis and their allies.

This period also witnessed another transformation. The Jews, who had been stateless since the beginning of the Common Era, established a home of their own with the creation of the state of Israel on May 14, 1948. The emergence of an independent Jewish homeland shifted worldwide Jewish geography; most survivors of Nazi persecutions moved as soon as they could from Europe to Israel. The Jewish communities of North Africa and the Middle East—Morocco, Libya, Tunisia, Egypt, Algeria, Syria, Yemen, Iraq, and Iran—converged on the newly formed state and in the process redrew the Jewish map. From that date forward American Jewry would place Israel and its security high on their political agenda.

These momentous developments, involving loss and gain, tragedy and redemption, took place far from the United States. This transformative

-205-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Jews of the United States, 1654 to 2000
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The S. Mark Taper Foundation Imprint in Jewish Studies *
  • Jewish Communities in the Modern World *
  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Part One - The Earliest Jewish Communities 11
  • 1 - 1654–1776 13
  • 2 - 1776–1820 41
  • Part Two - The Pivotal Century 69
  • 3 - 1820–1924 71
  • 4 - 1820–1924 112
  • 5 - 1820–1920 155
  • Part Three - Twentieth-Century Journeys 203
  • 6 - 1924–1948 205
  • 7 - 1948–1967 259
  • 8 - 1967–2000 305
  • Notes 359
  • Bibliography 395
  • Index 409
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 437

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.