Returning Cycles: Contexts for the Interpretation of Schubert's Impromptus and Last Sonatas

By Charles Fisk | Go to book overview

Notes

Prologue
1
Susan Youens, Retracing a Winter's Journey: Schubert's Winterreise (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1991), 103; Ludwig Stoffels, Die Winterreise (Bonn: Verlag für systematische Musikwissenschaft, 1987), 178–201; Richard Kramer, Distant Cycles: Schubert and the Conceiving of Song (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1994), 151–187.
2
Stoffels, 200.
3
Kramer, 164.
4
Youens, 24–28.
5
I return to the question of ascribing particular significance to “Mein Traum” in the epilogue.
6
His brother's heading may conceivably have been intended to discourage any speculation about the autobiographical content of Franz's story.
7
This translation is taken from Otto Erich Deutsch, ed., Franz Schubert's Letters and Other Writings (New York: Vienna House, 1974), 60. The entire story is given on 59–61.
8
See Elizabeth Norman McKay, Franz Schubert: A Biography (Oxford: Clarendon, 1996), 84ff.
9
For a fuller interpretation of the story, see Maynard Solomon, “Franz Schubert's 'My Dream,'” American Imago 38 (1981): 137–154.
10
Kramer, 182.
11
In an article that appeared after this book had been drafted, William Kinderman explores this question from more a cultural than a biographical standpoint; see “Wandering Archetypes in Schubert's Instrumental Music, ” 19th-Century Music 21, no. 2 (1997): 208–222. His particular points and his articulation of them are different enough from my own to be complementary to, rather than in conflict with or essentially similar to, mine. He focuses especially on the way Schubert's music, through its stark modal and

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