Four Gothic Novels

By Horace Walpole; William Beckford et al. | Go to book overview
A CHRONOLOGY OF MARY SHELLEY
1797 (30 August) Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin born at The Polygon, Somers Town, daughter of William Godwin and Mary Wollstonecraft, who dies ten days later
1807 Godwin family move to Skinner Street, Holbom
1812 (June) Goes to stay with the Baxter family at Dundee. Beginning of friendship between Godwin and Percy Bysshe Shelley
1814 (May) Returns to Skinner Street; meets Shelley again
(28 July) Mary, accompanied by her step-sister, Claire Clairmont, elopes with Shelley. Travel through France and Switzerland, and return to England
(August-September)
1815 (February) A daughter born prematurely to Mary and Shelley, but dies a few days later
(August) Settled with Shelley at Bishops Gate, Windsor
1816 (January) A son, William, born
(May) Mary and Shelley, with Claire Clairmont, leave England for Geneva, where they meet Lord Byron (who has already formed a liaison with Claire) and his physician Dr Polidori
(June) Mary, Shelley, and Claire settle at the Maison Chapuis, at Montalègre, close to Byron at the Villa Diodati at Cologny, near Geneva. Frankenstein begun
(July) Expedition to Chamonix and the Mer de Glace
(September) Return to England
(October) Suicide of Fanny Imlay, Mary's half-sister
(December) Suicide of Shelley's first wife, Harriet. Mary and Shelley married at St Mildred's Church, Bread Street, London (30 December)
1817 (March) Move to Marlow. Shelley refused custody of his children by his first marriage
(May) Frankenstein completed
(September) Daughter Clara born History of a Six-Weeks' Tour published
1818 (March) Mary and Shelley, with Claire and the children, leave for Italy. Frankenstein published
(June) Settled for two months at Bagni di Lucca
(September) Move to Este. The baby Clara dies in Venice. Visits to Byron in Venice
(November) Journey south to Rome
(December) Settle in Naples for the winter
1819 (March) Return to Rome, where her son William dies
(June) Departure for Leghorn
(September) Move to Florence for approaching confinement
(November) A son, Percy Florence, born
1820 (January) Move to Pisa and (June) to Leghorn

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Four Gothic Novels
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Four Gothic Novels *
  • The Castle of Otranto *
  • Contents *
  • The Castle of Otranto *
  • A Chronology of Horace Walpole *
  • The Castle of Otranto, - A Story. *
  • Preface to the First Edition *
  • Preface to the Second Edition *
  • Sonnet - To the Right Honourable Lady Mary Coke *
  • The Castle of Otranto - A Gothic Story *
  • Chapter I *
  • Chapter II 31
  • Chapter III 44
  • Chapter IV 57
  • Chapter V 69
  • Vathek *
  • A Chronology of William Beckford *
  • Vathek *
  • The Monk *
  • A Chronology of Matthew Lewis *
  • The Monk - A Romance *
  • Preface *
  • Table of the Poetry *
  • Advertisement *
  • Volume I *
  • Chapter I *
  • Chapter II 186
  • Chapter III 220
  • Volume II *
  • Chapter I *
  • Chapter II 283
  • Chapter III 304
  • Chapter IV 325
  • Volume III *
  • Chapter I *
  • Chapter II 357
  • Chapter III *
  • Chapter IV 403
  • Chapter V 430
  • Frankenstein *
  • A Chronology of Mary Shelley *
  • Frankenstein - Or the Modern Prometheus *
  • Introduction - [1831] *
  • Preface - [1818] *
  • Frankenstein or the Modern Prometheus *
  • Letter I *
  • Letter II 463
  • Letter III 466
  • Letter IV *
  • Chapter I 472
  • Chapter II 475
  • Chapter III 480
  • Chapter IV 485
  • Chapter V 490
  • Chapter VI 494
  • Chapter VII *
  • Chapter VIII *
  • Chapter IX *
  • Chapter X 517
  • Chapter XI 521
  • Chapter XII 527
  • Chapter XIII 531
  • Chapter XIV 535
  • Chapter XV *
  • Chapter XVI *
  • Chapter XVII 551
  • Chapter XVIII 554
  • Chapter XIX 560
  • Chapter XX 565
  • Chapter XXI 571
  • Chapter XXII 578
  • Chapter XXIII 585
  • Chapter XXIV 590
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