Rethinking Empowerment: Gender and Development in a Global/Local World

By Jane L. Parpart; Shirin M. Rai et al. | Go to book overview

and struggle will their process move social relations toward more just outcomes, both on the basis of gender and class. Active agency is what will provoke the (now meagre) process levers in bilateral and multilateral agencies to negotiate outcomes with host-country governments that have some potential to move toward gender power balance. It is a long and flawed process, but a political process for women to exercise political power with others to achieve gender balance.


References

Baden, Sally and Anne Marie Goetz (1997) 'Who needs [sex] when you can have [gender]? Conflicting discourses on gender at Beijing', in Kathleen Staudt (ed.) Women, International Development and Politics, Philadelphia: Temple University Press, pp. 37–58.

Basu, Amrita (ed.) (1995) The Challenge of Local Feminisms, Boulder: Westview.

Bellamy, Carol (1999) Press Release posted on http://www.unicef.org. Reported in Elizabeth Olson'Free markets leave women worse off, UNICEF says', New York Times, 23 September 1999.

Benería, Lourdes, and Shelley Feldman (1992) Unequal Burden: Economic Crises, Persistent Poverty, and Women's Work, Boulder: Westview.

Charlton, Sue Ellen, Jana Everett and Kathleen Staudt (eds) (1989) Women, the State, and Development, Albany: SUNY/Albany Press.

Cornia, Giovanni Andrew, Richard Jolly and Frances Stewart (eds) (1987) Adjustment with a Human Face, vols I and II, Oxford, UK:Clarendon Press.

Development Alternatives with Women for a New Era (DAWN) (Gita Sen and Caren Grown) (1985) Development, Crises, and Alternative Visions: Third World Women's Perspectives, New York: Monthly Review.

Elson, Diane (1996) 'Gender-neutral. gender-blind, or gender-sensitive budgets: Changing the conceptual framework to include women's empowerment and the economy of care', presented at the Commonwealth Ministers Responsible for Women's Affairs, Fifth Meeting, Port of Spain, Trinidad, 25–8 November.

——, (ed.) (1991) Male Bias in the Development Process, Manchester: Manchester University Press.

Ferguson, James (1990) The Anti Politics Machine: 'Development', Depoliticization and Bureaucratic Power in Lesotho, New York: Cambridge University Press.

Jahan, Rounaq (1995) The Elusive Agenda: Mainstreaming Women in Development, London: Zed.

Jaquette, Jane S. and Sharon L. Wolchik (1998) Women and Democracy: Latin America and Central and Eastern Europe, Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.

Kardam, Nüket (1991) Bringing Women in: Women's Issues in International Development Programs, Boulder: Lynne Rienner Publishers.

Mazumdar, Vina (1989) 'Seeds for a new model of development: A political commentary', in Ann Leonard (ed.) Seeds: Supporting Women's Work in the Third World, New York: Feminist Press, p. 217.

Mehta, Lyla (2001) 'The World Bank and its emerging knowledge empire', Human Organi zation 60(2): 189–96.

Moser, Caroline (1997) Household Responses to Poverty and Vulnerability, vols 1–4. Washington, DC: World Bank, Urban Management Programme.

—— (1993) Gender Planning and Development: Theory, Practice and Training, London: Routledge.

—— (1989) 'Gender planning in the Third World: Meeting practical and strategic needs', World Development 17(11): 1799–1826.

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