Teaching in the 21st Century: Adapting Writing Pedagogies to the College Curriculum

By Alice Robertson; Barbara Smith | Go to book overview

ing is an absolutely self-defeating act unless those involved find the means to enlarge their particular lifeworlds, and the teaching of literature—through a reader response pedagogy—still holds the most potential for this inspirational aspect of education.


NOTES
1
I assume many are familiar with the basic model for the various components affecting literary interpretation which can be found in M.H. Abrams The Mirror and the Lamp (New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1953). They include the “Work, ” “Universe, ” “Artist, ” and “Audience.” See Abrams, Chapter I.
2
There is no one way to understand reader response as a theoretical perspective. My understanding and application of it are my own but have come through the reading of various people and books, especially those interested in how this approach affects teaching. These books include Robert E. Probst, Response and Analysis: Teaching Literature in Junior and Senior High School (Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann/Boynton Cook, 1988); Nicholas J. Karolides, Reader Response in the Classroom: Evoking and Interpreting Meaning in Literature (New York and London: Longman, 1992); J.A. Appleyard, S.J., Becoming A Reader: The Experience of Fiction from Childhood to Adulthood (New York and Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990); Richard Beach, A Teacher's Introduction to Reader-Response Theories (Urbana, IL: National Council of Teachers of English, 1993); and Alan C. Purves, Theresa Rogers, and Anna O. Soter, How Porcupines Make Love III: Readers, Texts, Cultures in the Response-Based Literature Classroom (New York: Longman, 1995). I must thank Buffalo State College for a minigrant that gave me release time and money to develop a course about teaching literature.
3
Patricia Bizzell, “College Composition: Initiation into the Academic Discourse Community, ” Curriculum Inquiry 12 (1982), 191–207.
4
This definition stems from my reading of two books: Probst's Response and Analysis and Karolides' Reader Response in the Classroom.
5
Those familiar with composition theory and writing pedagogy will most likely have heard already obvious relationships between process-approaches to composition and this reader-response approach to literature. Activities like freewriting are clearly linked to beginning the study of literature with personal responses; having students become aware of themselves as writers in order to understand their own process better and determine possible interventions to improve the process links directly to attempts within reader response to have readers become aware of the forces affecting the ways they read and respond; having

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