Teaching in the 21st Century: Adapting Writing Pedagogies to the College Curriculum

By Alice Robertson; Barbara Smith | Go to book overview

in their field. I believe that this is true because we can never really become a member of another culture or gender (except perhaps in very rare circumstances, for example, transexualism or adoption into another culture at a very young age); we can only be a guest in it. Students who have learned to see themselves as professionals in their field more easily adapt to that role, but have trouble switching to the role of professional in another field. I am not sure if the limits of human objectivity allow for giving equal weight to the perspective of the Other. However, through role-playing, students are made aware of differences in approaches, mindsets, attitudes, and assumptions, and learn to consider, respect, and integrate them in their formative years of problem-solving skill development.


NOTES
1
Kenneth A. Bruffee, Collaborative Learning: Higher Education, Interdependence, and the Authority of Knowledge (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1993).
2
John Bean, Engaging Ideas: The Professor's Guide to Integrating Writing, Critical Thinking, and Active Learning in the Classroom (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1996), 165.
3
Ibid., 184.
4
For more on the educational value of collaborative learning, see Kenneth A. Bruffee, “Collaborative Learning and the 'Conversation of Mankind,'” College English 46.7 (November 1984): 635–52.
5
Susan Glaspell, “A Jury of Her Peers, ” in Great Short Stories by American Women, ed. Candace Ward (New York: Dover, 1996), 153–73.
6
Elizabeth A. Flynn, “Composing as a Woman, ” in Cross-Talk in Comp Theory, ed. Victor Villanueva Jr. (Urbana, Ill.: National Council of Teachers of English, 1997), 553.
7
Ibid.
8
Ibid.
9
Ibid., 554.
10
Glaspell, 158.
11
Adapted from Raymond J. Corsini, Malcolm E. Shaw, and Robert R. Blake, Role-playing in Business and Industry (New York: The Free Press, 1961).
12
Ibid., 8.
13
Ibid., 20.
14
Bean, 94.
15
J.H. Flavell, The Developmental Psychology of Jean Piaget (New York: Van Nostrand, 1963), 60, quoted in Bean, 127.

-133-

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