Teaching in the 21st Century: Adapting Writing Pedagogies to the College Curriculum

By Alice Robertson; Barbara Smith | Go to book overview

ESSAY 10
A Pedagogy of Community and Collaboration: A Beginning
BILL BROZ

I think this class is going to be fun because so far you seem to be a good teacher. When you were describing yourself I found out you had some of the same hobbies I have. I also noticed that you are the first professor that actually talked about himself.

—A Student

Currently I am teaching two sections of English 100, the basic writing course at Western Illinois University, and one section of English 384, composition pedagogy for English education students. Both courses were in their ninth week of the semester, just past midterm when I wrote this essay. Throughout this article I share comments and experiences of these students. For example, at the end of the first class period in English 100, I asked my two groups of mostly traditional freshmen to write three short anonymous journal entries to the following writing prompts: “What do you think this class is going to be like? What do you hope this class is going to be like? What do you fear this class is going to be like?” One student's response given above is an I/eye-opener.

Pedagogy is the art of teaching. Scholarship is the systematized knowledge of a learned person and the ability to create and acquire such knowledge. Accepting the validity of the first premise of this book, that we in composition studies have learned something about pedagogy in the last thirty years, then what we have learned has something to do with enhancing this relationship between pedagogy and scholarship. In that light I

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