Teaching in the 21st Century: Adapting Writing Pedagogies to the College Curriculum

By Alice Robertson; Barbara Smith | Go to book overview

classrooms shifts from an author(ity) to an informed facilitator or monitor, and, as such, I learn each semester from my readers and from my own experiences more of what it means to be a writer, a reader, and a human being. As I've come to discover, the differences between being a writer and a reader are far fewer than I had been taught to believe, and the boundaries separating writing and reading continually become less and less distinct.


NOTES
1
I would like to thank Ann Dobie for her patience and her wisdom and Michael Lowenstein, Alice Robertson, and Barbara Smith for their insights on, and assistance with, this text.
2
James Berlin, Rhetorics, Poetics, Cultures: Refiguring College English Studies (Urbana, Il.: National Council of Teachers of English, 1996), xii.
3
James Berlin, Rhetoric and Reality: Writing Instruction in American Colleges, 1900–1985 (Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1987), 26.
4
Modern Language Association, “Report on the Future of the Profession, ” PMLA 97 (1982): 952.
5
Susan Miller, Textual Carnivals: The Politics of Composition (Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1991).
6
Raymond Williams, Marxism and Literature (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1977), 47.
7
Berlin, in Rhetorics, Poetics, Cultures, attributes this separation to the shift from entrepreneurial to corporate capitalism while Susan Miller, in Textual Carnivals, claims that writing initially served as an ancillary to rhetoric and then later to literature.
8
S. Michael Halloran, “From Rhetoric to Composition: The Teaching of Writing in America to 1900, ” in A Short History of Writing Instruction: From Ancient Greece to Twentieth Century America, ed. James J. Murphy (Davis, Cal.: Hermagoras Press, 1990), 151–82.
9
Peter Elbow, “The War Between Writing and Reading—And How to End It, ” Rhetoric Review 12 (1993): 5, 8.
10
Dana Harrington, “Composition, Literature, and the Emergence of Modern Reading Practices, ” Rhetoric Review 15 (1997): 250–52. See also Jane Tompkins, “The Reader in History: The Changing Shape of Literary Response, ” in Reader-Response Criticism, ed. Jane Tompkins (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1980), 201–32.
11
Susan Miller, “What Does It Mean to Be Able to Write?” College English 45 (1983): 221.

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