Teaching in the 21st Century: Adapting Writing Pedagogies to the College Curriculum

By Alice Robertson; Barbara Smith | Go to book overview

and what a person in fact does. None of the policies proposed by the students in my course were satisfactory to them, because each student saw (to, admittedly, different degrees) that any action that could be taken did not accord with the knowledge upon which that action was based, and that it could not be explained in completely rational terms. Clearly this is not the conventional view of constructivism that rests content with the knowledge that what we understand both constructs and is constructed by discourse. What we learned in my course was that it is more important to see that what we do not understand also constructs and is constructed by discourse. As I suggested at the outset of this essay, case studies can have a very important role in the writing classroom, particularly the constructivist classroom. In part that role ought to be to remind us that even though we realize that language and ideology shape our world, there's a good deal more to that world than an analysis of either language or ideology can show us.


NOTES
1
Rita Silverman and William M. Welty, “Case Studies in Diversity for University Faculty Development” (included in packet of materials on case studies for faculty development distributed at the Center for Case Studies in Education, Pace University, New York, 1993), 2.
2
See Andrea Lunsford, “The Nature of Composition Studies, ” in An Introduction to Composition Studies, ed. Erika Lindemann and Gary Tate (New York: Oxford University Press, 1991), 10–12, for one concise statement of this trend.
3
Rita Silverman (included in untitled packet of material distributed at the Wakonse Conference on College Teaching, Pace University, New York, 25–31 May 1995), 2.
4
Ibid.
5
Ibid.
6
Ibid., 21.
7
Ibid., 1.
8
See Aristotle, Rhetoric, in The Rhetoric and Poetics of Aristotle, trans. W. Rhys Roberts and Ingram By water (1954; reprint, New York: Modern Library, 1984), 2:3–17; 1:2.
9
Sandra Harding, “Rethinking Standpoint Epistemology: What Is 'Strong Objectivity'?” Centennial Review 36.3 (Fall 1992): 460.
10
Randy Shilts, And the Band Played On: Politics, People, and the AIDS Epidemic (New York: St. Martin's, 1987).
11
Silverman, 2.

-356-

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