Local Communities and Post-Communist Transformation: Czechoslovakia, the Czech Republic and Slovakia

By Simon Smith | Go to book overview
Save to active project
facilitate and structure (see Čambáliková 1992:71). This 'back-to-front' development, in which a tripartite council emerged not as an historic compromise following a period of conflict between unions and capital or the state, but as a 'preventive' institution in anticipation of possible future conflict (Mansfeldová 1997:104), produced for unions a temporary imbalance between influence and legitimacy, which was subsequently slowly restored. ČMKOS and KOZ SR, the two countries' main union confederations, are now possibly stronger as organisations than they might have been if they had been forced to secure influence from the start by demonstrating their strength through mobilising a labour interest, but trade unions as 'intersubjective communities' are undoubtedly different due to their unorthodox post-revolutionary regeneration, a fact which is evident from a comparision with Polish experience, where the post-communist state has not embraced corporatist solutions to the same extent (Smith 2000). Which of them produces a more 'representative' pattern of interest organisation? Przeworski et al. argue that the preservation of some aspects of a 'state corporatist' format following a regime transition may be beneficial if the alternative of 'a sudden shift to a purely voluntaristic format could jeopardise the very existence of some organised interests' (1995:56). The higher rates of unionisation in the Czech and Slovak Republics compared with other post-communist countries offer some support to this argument, but the relative long-term strength of different organisations is hard to predict.
6
Anti-myths are also narrative devices enabling actors to reconcile themselves with disorder, but on a different basis. Instead of stimulating the vision of a new order, they rationalise the irreversibility of the fall into chaos. They thus legitimise a fatalistic approach to social reality, an orientation on short-term gains and an unwillingness to bear sacrifices, which are irrational if the 'myth' of an eventual restoration of order is incredible (Kabele 1998:317–18).
7
It is obvious that agricultural or certain types of industrial communities have greatest difficulty adapting to macro-economic transformation, because its institutional consequences (above all unemployment) are particularly destructive for them. But is their low adaptive capacity linked also to an inability to narrativise change? Majerová identified as a characteristic attitude among manual agricultural workers 'a rejection of any kind of changes and a demand for the preservation of the same work in the same enterprise under the same conditions' (1999:245). This intransigence could be related, she suggests, to low levels of educational attainment, a deficit in civic organisational skills, and also to the strong social control mechanisms which prevail in a village setting and which render more visible illegitimacies and inequities in the privatisation process. For these reasons agricultural communities constitute a cultural milieu which is resistant to the heroic mythologisation of privatisation and marketisation and at the same time poorly equipped with the communication skills necessary to express alternative transformation narratives.

Bibliography

Ágh, A. (1998) The Politics of Central Europe, London: Sage.

Baethge, M. (1997) 'Introduction', in Baethge, M., Adamski, W. and Greskovits, B. (eds) Social Structures in the Making. Sisyphus Social Studies vol. X, Warsaw: IFiS: 7–13.

-218-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Local Communities and Post-Communist Transformation: Czechoslovakia, the Czech Republic and Slovakia
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 224

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.