Persuasive Imagery: A Consumer Response Perspective

By Linda M. Scott; Rajeev Batra | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TWO
A Review of the
Visual Rhetoric Literature
Keith Kenney
University of South Carolina
Linda M. Scott
University of Illinois

For the first half of the 20th century in America, rhetoric was primarily the domain of speech teachers, who gave practical advice about influencing audiences through public oratory, radio announcing, drama, debate, and town meetings. The writings of classical rhetoricians like Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, and Quintilian were used to teach students how to choose and speak their words. Although visual elements like facial expression, posture, dress, and gesture were then, as always, encompassed by rhetorical principles, the emphasis was so squarely on verbal aspects of communication that many came to identify rhetoric with language.

In the second half of the 20th century, much about both the expression and conceptualization of persuasion changed. Although graphical rhetoric had become finely tuned in the posters and magazines of the early century, the explosion of television in the postwar period foregrounded the visual conduits for persuasion with greater impact and urgency. Not only were political movements increasingly orchestrated around “photo opportunities” like marches and sit-ins, but the “image management” of politicians became central to campaigns from the 1960 Kennedy-Nixon debate through the saxophone-playing “sound bites” of Bill Clinton. Throughout these five decades, the growing importance of a new conceptualization of rhetoric, advanced by philosopher and literary critic Kenneth Burke, was felt in academic disciplines from literature to art. In this new approach to persuasion, nonverbal forms were more prominently included. And, in turn, other areas of study—anthropology and even economics—were recast and reanalyzed in rhetorical terms. Thus, by the end of the century, a major shift had occurred on two fronts: Not only was the idea of “persuasion” being expanded to

-17-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Persuasive Imagery: A Consumer Response Perspective
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 436

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.