Persuasive Imagery: A Consumer Response Perspective

By Linda M. Scott; Rajeev Batra | Go to book overview

REFERENCES

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A meta-analytic review of research on the physical attractiveness stereotype. Psychology Bulletin, 110(1), 109–126.

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Gardner, M. (2001, January 24). Slim but curvy—The pursuit of ideal beauty. Christian Science Monitor, p. 16.

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Kalof, L. (1999). Stereotyped evaluative judgements and female attractiveness. Gender Issues, 17(2), 68–83.

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