Interpersonal Communication Research: Advances through Meta-Analysis

By Mike Allen; Raymond W. Preiss et al. | Go to book overview

that one can demonstrate that communication apprehension aversively impacts educational performance, which in turn retards employment opportunities, then one can make a strong case for implementing programs to help undergraduates overcome their apprehension.

Finally, we will need to overcome our own inertia. Most researchers, including myself, are comfortable with what they do. After all, it is what has resulted in professional and personal career success. However, it would be a mistake to suggest to young scholars and graduate students that the “tried and true” path to success will work in the future. Although I do not wish to overstate the case, I suspect that current practices will be ineffective for the next generation of scholars. External accountability pressures are increasing, and they will render less relevant field-driven evaluations of research programs. Hence, academic survival and success will increasingly depend on the ability to demonstrate that one conducts research that makes a difference to society. In doing so, we not only ensure our own survival, but we simultaneously improve the quality of our scholarship and the society in which we live.


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I wish to acknowledge the assistance of each of the following people in inspiring and completing this project: Professors Peter Miller, Charles Berger, Joseph Cappella, and Gaylen Paulson.

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