Anecdotes of Painting in England: With Some Account of the Principal Artists - Vol. 2

By Horace Walpole | Go to book overview

WEESOP

arrived here in 1641, a little before the death of Vandyck, of whose manner he was a lucky imitator, and had the honour of having some of his pictures pass for that master's. He left England in 1649, saying, " He would never stay in a country where they cut of their king's head and were not ashamed of the action." It had been more sensible to say, he would not stay where they cut off the head of a king that rewarded painters, and defaced and sold his collection. One John Weesop, probably his son, was buried in St. Martin's in 1652.


JOHN DE CRITZ

has been mentioned in a previous chapter. Though serjeant- painter to Charles I. he may more properly be called a retainer to the arts than a professor. His life is to be collected rather from office-books than from his works or his reputation. Yet he was not ignorant. I have two sketches of heads drawn by him with a pen, that are masterly. Vertue saw many more in the hands of Murray the painter who was scholar of a son or nephew of De Critz, who, according to Murray, painted bravely scenes for masks. Among those drawings was a sketch from a picture of Sir Philip Sidney, 1 then at the house of De Critz, and now in the possession of Lord Chesterfield. 2 At Oatlands he painted a middle piece for a ceiling, which, on the dispersion of the king's effects, was sold for 20l. In 1657 he painted the portrait of Serjeant Maynard with a paper in his hand. In a book belonging to the Board of Works was a payment to John De Critz, for repairing pictures of Palma and the

____________________
1
In the Earl of Oxford's library was a copy of Holland's Heröologia, in which in an old hand, supposed to be done immediately after the publication of the book in 1618, was written where every picture was from which the prints were taken. That of Sir Philip Sidney is the same with Lord Chesterfield's, and under was written, at Mr. De Critz's—strong evidences of this being a genuine picture.—This most curious book is now in the British Museum.—D.
2
Evelyn's Diary. " At Wilton, richly gilded and painted with story, by De Critz," vol. ii.—D.

-15-

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