Anecdotes of Painting in England: With Some Account of the Principal Artists - Vol. 2

By Horace Walpole | Go to book overview
Save to active project

ANNE CARLISLE,

a paintress, admired for her copies (it is not said whether in oil or miniature) from Italian masters. Graham 1 says, she was in such favour with King Charles that he presented her and Vandyck with as much ultramarine at one time as cost him above 500l. If her share was near equal, I should suppose she painted in oil. It would be a very long time before the worth of 200l. in ultramarine could be employed in miniatures. Vertue mentions her teaching a lady to paint, whose picture she drew standing behind her own ; herself was sitting with a book of drawings in her lap ; and he adds that many pieces painted by her were in the possession of a widow, Lady Cotterel. Mrs. Carlisle died about 1680. 2


JOHN PETITOT,

(1607—1691,)

was patronised by the two monarchs who of late years have given the noblest encouragement to artists—Charles I. and Louis XIV. He deserved their protection as a genius, and has never been equalled in enamel. Zincke alone has once or twice, and but once or twice, produced works that might stand in competition with any single performance of Petitot.

The latter was born at Geneva in 1607 ; his father, a sculptor and architect, having passed part of his life in Italy, had retired to that city. The son was designed for a jeweller, and having frequent occasion to make use of enamel, he attained such a tone of colour, 3 that Bordier,

____________________
1
English School.—Sanderson, among the female painters of his time, mentions "that worthy artist Mrs. Carlisle," p. 20.—D.
2
Her chief excellence was shown in beautiful copies of Italian pictures in miniature, like those of Isaac and Peter Oliver, of which style Charles I. was an admirer.—D.
3
The art of enamelling was anciently practised to great perfection at Venice and Limoges; but in those times was solely applied to orfievrie, or goldsmith's work. By the jewellers well acquainted with the nature of the operation, figures and portraits were first attempted, having been long applied to flowers and mosaics. Petitot had been a jeweller, and has just claims to be considered not only the first, in priority of time, but of excellence. He may indeed be called the "Inventor of Portraits in Enamel," although Peter Bordier, his brother-in-law, had made

-31-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Anecdotes of Painting in England: With Some Account of the Principal Artists - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 336

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?