Anecdotes of Painting in England: With Some Account of the Principal Artists - Vol. 2

By Horace Walpole | Go to book overview
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ANDREW KEARNE,

a German, was brother-in-law of Nicholas Stone the elder, for whom he worked. Kearne too carved many statues for Sir Justinian Isham, at his house near Northampton. At Somerset-stairs he carved the river-god which answered to the Nile, made by Stone, and a lioness on the water-gate of York-stairs. For the Countess of Mulgrave a Venus and Apollo of Portland Stone, six feet high, for each of which he had seven pounds. He died in England, and left a son that was alive since 1700.


JOHN SCHURMAN,

born at Embden, was another of Stone's workmen, and afterwards set up for himself. He was employed by Sir John Baskerville; made two shepherds sitting, for Sir John Davers of Chelsea; a marble statue of Sir T. Lucy, for his tomb in Warwickshire, for which he was paid eighteen pounds, and fifty shillings for polishing and glazing: the same for a statue on Lord Belhaven's tomb; 1 a little boy on the same monument; two sphinxes for Sir John Davers; and Hercules and Antæus for that gentleman's garden, at the rate of sixteen pounds.


EDWARD PIERCE,

father and son, are mentioned here together, though the father was a painter chiefly in the reign of the first Charles, the son a statuary, who worked mostly under the second Charles; but each may be allotted to either period The father painted history, landscape 2 and architecture; but the greater part of his works, consisting of altar-pieces and ceilings of churches, were destroyed in the fire of London. One of his ceilings was in the church of Covent-garden. For some time he worked under Vandyck, and several of his performances are at the Duke of Rutland's at Belvoir.

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1
This tomb of Douglas, Lord Belhaven, is in the Church of the abbey of Holy- rood-house.
2
James II. had one of his hand. See the catalogue.

-40-

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