Anecdotes of Painting in England: With Some Account of the Principal Artists - Vol. 2

By Horace Walpole | Go to book overview

graving, which Johnson never did, calling Simon a puncher, not a graver. Johnson besides painted landscapes from nature, selecting the most beautiful views of England, which he executed, it is said, 1 with much judgment, freedom, and warmth of colouring. His works are scarce. He died about the beginning of the reign of James II.


—GREEN,

a seal-cutter, is only mentioned in a letter 2 to the Lord Treasurer from Lord Strafford, who says he had paid him one hundred pounds for the seals of Ireland, but which were cut in England.


CHRISTIAN VAN VIANEN. 3

As there was no art which Charles did not countenance, the chasers and embossers of plate were among the number of the protected at court. The chief was Vianen, whose works are greatly commended by Ashmole. 4 Several pieces of plate of his design were at Windsor, particularly two large gilt water-pots, which cost 235l., two candlesticks weighing 471 ounces; (on the foot of one of them was chased Christ preaching on the Mount; on the other, the parable of the Lost Sheep;) and two covers for a Bible and Common Prayer-Book, weighing 233 ounces: the whole amounting to 3,580 ounces, and costing 1,564l., were, in the year 1639, when the last parcels were delivered, presented as offerings by his majesty to the chapel of St. George. But in 1642, Captain Foy broke open the treasury, and carried away all these valuable curiosities, as may be seen more at large in Dugdale. An agreement was made with the Earl Marshal, Sir Francis Windebank, and Sir Francis Crane, for plate to be wrought for the king at twelve shillings per ounce; and before the month of June, 1637, he had finished nine pieces. Some of these I suppose were the above-mentioned : others were gilt, for Vianen complained that by the expense

____________________
1
English School.
2
Strafford Papers, June 9, 1633.
3
He was at Nuremberg. See Wren's Parentalia, p. 136.
4
Order of the Garter, p. 492.

-47-

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