Anecdotes of Painting in England: With Some Account of the Principal Artists - Vol. 2

By Horace Walpole | Go to book overview
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Endymion Porter, ætat. 48, 1635. And Margareta, uxor, æt. 25. 1633. I have a good medal of Cardinal Richelieu by Warin, who died in 1675, as I learn from a jetton of him by Dacier. Warin was exceedingly fond of money, and having forced his daughter, who was beautiful, to marry a rich and deformed officer of the revenue, she poisoned herself a few days after the wedding, saying, " I must perish, since my father's avarice would have it so."—V. Lettres de Guy Patin; and Recreations Histor. vol. i. p. 75, 1768. 1

The last artist that I have to produce of this period, but the greatest in his profession that has appeared in these kingdoms, and so great, that in that reign of arts we scarce know the name of another architect, was


INIGO JONES,

(1572—1652,)

who, if a table of fame like that in the Tatler were to be formed for men of real and indisputable genius in every country, would save England from the disgrace of not having her representative among the arts. She adopted Holbein and Vandyck, she borrowed Rubens, she produced Inigo Jones. Vitruvius drew up his grammar, Palladio showed him the practice, Rome displayed a theatre worthy of his emulation, and King Charles was ready to encourage, employ, and reward his talents. This is the history of Inigo Jones as a genius. The particulars of his life have been often written, and therefore I shall run them over very briefly; adding some less known minutiæ [which, I fear, are the characteristics of these volumes] and some catalogue of his works.

He was born about 1572, the son of a clothworker, and by the most probable accounts bound apprentice to a joiner; but even in that obscure situation, the bright- ness of his capacity burst forth so strongly, that he was taken notice of by one of the great lords at court; some say, it was the Earl of Arundel; the greater 2 number that

____________________
1
[This was Nov. 10, 1651. The whole passage is quoted by De Fontenai.—W.]
2
Among whom is Loyd in his Memoires, p. 577.

-52-

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