Anecdotes of Painting in England: With Some Account of the Principal Artists - Vol. 2

By Horace Walpole | Go to book overview

old men, he had ten pounds each, in 1652 ; that he paid twenty-five pounds for the Venus putting on her smock (by Titian), which was the king's, and valued it at sixty pounds, as he was told by Mrs. Boardman, who copied it, a paintress of whom I find no other mention: 1 and that Walker copied Titian's famous Venus, which was purchased by the Spanish ambassador, and for which the king had been offered 2,500l. He adds, Walker cries up De Critz for the best painter in London.

Walker had, for some time, an apartment in Arundel- house, 2 and died a little before the Restoration; 3 his own portrait is at Leicester-house, and in the Picture-gallery at Oxford. Mr. Onslow has a fine whole-length, sitting in a chair, of Keble, keeper of the great seal in 1650, by this painter.


EDWARD MASCALL

drew another portrait of Cromwell, which the Duke of Chandos bought of one Clark, then of the age of 106, but hearty and strong, who had been summoned to London on a cause of Lord Coningsby. This man had formerly been servant of Mascall, and had married his widow, and was at that time possessed of 300l. a year, at Trewelin, in Herefordshire. He had several pictures painted by Mascall. Of the latter there is an indifferent print, inscribed, "Effigies Edwardi Mascall, pictoris, sculpta ab exemplari propriâ manu depicto. James Gammon sculpsit."


HEYWOOD.

Of this person I find no mention, but that in 1650 he drew the portrait of General Fairfax, which was in the possession of Mr. Brian Fairfax. A draught from this by one James Hulet was produced to the Society of Antiquaries, by Mr. Peck, in 1739.

____________________
1
He names, too, Loveday and Wray, equally unknown.
2
Walker had not a residence in Arundel-house before the death of Henry Frederic, Earl of Arundel, when the government took possession of it.—D.
3
There is a good print of Walker, holding a drawing, by Lombart.—From the original at Belvoir-castle.—D.

-73-

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