Anecdotes of Painting in England: With Some Account of the Principal Artists - Vol. 2

By Horace Walpole | Go to book overview

THOMAS MANBY,

a landscape-painter, who had studied in Italy, whence he brought a collection of pictures that were sold in the Banqueting-house. He lived ten years after the preceding.


NICHOLAS BYER,

born at Drontheim in Norway, painted both history and portraits. He was employed by Sir William Temple for three or four years, at his house at Sheen, near Richmond, where he died. All that Graham knew relating to him was that he was the first man buried in St. Clement's Danes, after it was rebuilt, which had been founded by his countrymen.


ADAM COLONI, (1634—1681,)

of Rotterdam, lived many years in England, and was famous for small figures, country-wakes, cattle, fire-pieces, &c. He copied many pictures of Bassan, particularly those in the royal collection. He died in London, 1685, at the age of 51, and was buried in St. Martin's. His son, Henry Adrian Coloni, was instructed by his father and by his brother-in-law, Vandiest, and drew well. He sometimes painted in the landscapes of the latter, and imitated Salvator Rosa. He was buried near his father, in 1701, at the age of thirty-three.


JOHN GRIFFIERE, [THE OLD, 1645—1718,]

an agreeable painter, called the gentleman of Utrecht, was born at Amsterdam, in 1645, and placed apprentice to a carpenter, a profession not at all suiting his inclination. He knew he did not like to be a carpenter, but had not discovered his own bent. He quitted his master, and was put to school, but becoming acquainted with a lad who was learning to paint earthenware, young Griffiere was struck with the science, though in so rude a form, and passed his time in assisting his friend instead of going to school, yet returning regularly at night, as if he had been there. This deception, however, could not long impose on his father, who prudently yielded to the force of the boy's genius; but while he gratified it, hoped to secure him a profession, and bound him

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