Anecdotes of Painting in England: With Some Account of the Principal Artists - Vol. 2

By Horace Walpole | Go to book overview
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dwarf and his master Francesco Cleyne, in green habits as archers, with bows and arrows, and he had preserved Gibson's bow, who was fond of archery. Gibson taught Queen Anne to draw, and went to Holland to instruct her sister, the Princess of Orange. The small couple had nine children, five of which lived to maturity, and were of a proper size. Richard, the father, died in the seventy-fifth year of his age, and was buried 1 at Covent-garden; his little widow lived till 1709, when she was eighty-nine years old. 2


WILLIAM GIBSON,

nephew of the preceding, was taught by him and Sir Peter Lely, and copied the latter happily; but chiefly practised miniature. 3 He bought great part of Sir Peter's collection, and added much to it. Dying of a lethargy in 1702, at the age of fifty-eight, he was buried at Richmond, as was


EDWARD GIBSON,

I suppose, son of the dwarf. This young man began with painting portraits in oil, but changed that manner for crayons. His own picture, done by himself in this way, 1690, was at Tart-hall. Edward died at the age of thirty- three.


JOHN DIXON,

scholar of Sir Peter Lely, painted both in miniature and crayons, but mostly the former. In the latter was his own head. In water-colours, there are great numbers of his works; above sixty were in Lord Oxford's collection, both portraits and histories, particularly Diana and her Nymphs bathing, after Poelenburg, and a sleeping Venus, Cupids, and a Satyr. These were his best works. He was keeper of the king's picture closet ; and in 1698, was concerned in a bubble lottery. The whole sum was to be 40,000l. divided into 1,214 prizes, the highest prize in money, 3,000l.,

____________________
1
From the register, Richard Gibson died July 23, 1690.—Nature recompensed their shortness of stature by length of years.—D.
2
"The compendious couple yet living (1697), of the late Mr. Gibson, the minute man, of stature suitable, deservedly numbered among our tallest and best miniature painters of the age." Evelyn's Numismata, p. 268.—D.
3
"Of that part only of it which consisted in drawings and sketches of the old masters."—D.

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