Anecdotes of Painting in England: With Some Account of the Principal Artists - Vol. 2

By Horace Walpole | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIII.

STATUARIES, CARVERS, ARCHITECTS, AND MEDALLISTS, IN THE REIGN OF
CHARLES II.

THOMAS BURMAN

is only known by being the master of Bushnell, and by his epitaph in the churchyard of Covent-garden :—

" Here lyes interred Thomas Burman, sculptor, of the parish of St. Martin's in the Fields, who departed this life March 17th, 1673-4, aged 56 years."

He is mentioned above, in Mr. Beale's notes, for executing a tomb at Walton-upon-Thames.


BOWDEN, LATHAM, AND BONNE,

three obscure statuaries in this reign, of whom I find few particulars; the first was a captain of the trained bands, and was employed at Wilton ; so was Latham: 1 his portrait, leaning on a bust, was painted by Fuller. Latham and Bonne worked together on the monument of Archbishop Sheldon. 2 The figure of John Sobieski, which was bought by Sir Robert Vyner, and set up at Stock's market for Charles II., came over unfinished, and a new head was added by Latham; but the Turk on whom Sobieski was trampling, remained with the whole group, till removed to make way for the Lord Mayor's mansion-house.


WILLIAM EMMETT

was sculptor to the crown before Gibbons, and had succeeded his uncle, one Philips. There is a poor mezzotinto of Emmett, by himself.

____________________
1
I suppose this is the same person who petitioned the council of state after the death of Cromwell, for goods belonging to the king, which he had purchased, and the Protector detained. See vol. i.
2
In Lysons's Environs, vol. i. p. 183, is an engraving of Archbishop Sheldon's monument in the church of Croydon, taken from a very beautiful drawing by Sir T. Lawrence, which gives a more favourable idea of the merit of the sculptor, whether Latham or Bonne. It is of white marble, and is executed with great truth to nature and character. The bas-reliefs on the sides exhibit a charnel- house.—D.

-164-

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