Anecdotes of Painting in England: With Some Account of the Principal Artists - Vol. 2

By Horace Walpole | Go to book overview

more common than his pictures. The Duke of Buckingham, returning through Flanders from his embassy to Paris, found Sybrecht at Antwerp, was pleased with his works, invited him to England, and employed him at Cliefden. In 1686 he made several views of Chatsworth. At Newstead- abbey, Lord Byron's, are two pieces by this hand ; the first, a landscape, in the style of Rubens's school ; the other, which is better, a prospect of Longleat, not unlike the manner of Wouverman. Sybrecht died in 1703, aged seventy-three, and was buried in St. James's.


HENRY TILSON

was grandson of Henry Tilson, Bishop of Elphin, born in Yorkshire, and who died in 1655. Young Henry was bred under Sir Peter Lely, after whose death he went to Italy, in company with Dahl, and stayed seven years, copying the works of the best masters with great diligence. He succeeded in portraits, both oil and crayons, and was likely to make a figure, when he grew disordered in his senses, and shot himself at the age of thirty-six. 1 He was buried at St. Dunstan's in the West. He painted his own portrait two or three times ; once with a pencil in his hand, leaning on a bust. Behind it was written, H. Tilsona. Roma, 1687. He drew a large family-picture of his father, mother, a younger brother, a sister, and himself. Dahl gave Tilson his own picture, inscribed behind, " Memoria per mio caro amico Henrico Tilson fatto in Roma 1686."


FANCATI,

an Italian, copied the portraits of James and his queen with a pen, from the originals of Kneller. They were highly laboured, and came into the possession of Dr. George Clarke, of Oxford.


THOMAS BENIERE,

a young statuary, who flourished in this reign, was born in England, of French parents, in 1663. His models and

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1
While at Rome he copied from Carracci, Correggio, and Titian, in crayons, with great success. He destroyed himself from a disappointment in love.—D.

-195-

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