Anecdotes of Painting in England: With Some Account of the Principal Artists - Vol. 2

By Horace Walpole | Go to book overview
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ignorant surgeon, who pricked an artery, he died of it in 1698, in Aldermanbury, and was buried in the church of St. Mary Magdalen, Bermondsey, in Southwark. Vertue had a large picture by Fuller, containing the portraits of several painters and of one woman ; the person in the middle was Le Piper.


THOMAS SADLER

was second 1 son of John Sadler, 2 a master in chancery, much in favour with Oliver Cromwell, who 3 offered him the post of Chief Justice of Munster in Ireland, with a salary of 1,000l. a year, which he refused. Thomas Sadler was educated at Lincoln's-inn, being designed for the law; but having imbibed instructions from Sir Peter Lely, with whom he was intimate, he painted at first in miniature for his amusement, and portraits towards the end of his life, having by unavoidable misfortune been reduced to follow that profession. There remain in his family a small Moonlight, part of a landscape on copper, and a miniature of the Duke of Monmouth, by whom and by Lord Russel he was trusted in affairs of great moment—a connexion very natural, as Mr. Sadler's mother 4 was of the ancient and public- spirited family of Trenchard. A print of John Bunyan after Sadler has lately been published in mezzotinto. His son, Mr. Thomas Sadler, was deputy-clerk of the Pells, and drew too. His fine collection of agates, shells, drawings, &c. were sold a few years ago on his death.


GODFREY SCHALKEN,

(1643—1796,)

a great master, if tricks in an art, or the mob, could decide on merit: 5 a very confined genius, when rendering a single

____________________
1
This article is re-adjusted from the information of his grandson, Rob. Seymour Sadler, Esq. of the Inner Temple ; Vertue having confounded Thomas Sadler with his second cousin, Ebenezer Sadler, who was the person that was steward to Lord Salisbury.
2
For a more particular account of him, see the Hist. and Critical Dict. vol. ix. pp. 19, 20, and Dugdale's Origines Judiciales.
3
The original letter is still in the possession of his great-grandson.
4
See her descent from Sir Henry Seymour, in the two last editions of Collins's Peerage.
5
Four of his best works are in the Louvre Gallery, and a spirited portrait of

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