Anecdotes of Painting in England: With Some Account of the Principal Artists - Vol. 2

By Horace Walpole | Go to book overview
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he had taught to draw, carried him to Ireland, where he painted small portraits in oil, had great business and high prices. His flowers and fruit were so much admired, that one bunch of grapes sold there for 40l. In his Magdalens he generally introduced a thistle on the foreground. In Painters'-hall is a small Magdalen, with this signature,

1662. He had several scholars, particularly Maubert, and one Gandy of Exeter. However, notwithstanding his success, he died poor in Ireland, 1707.


THOMAS VAN WYCK

(1616—1686)

was born at Harlem, 1616, and became an admired painter of seaports, shipping, and small figures. 1 He passed some years in Italy, and imitated Bamboccio. He came to England about the time of the Restoration. Lord Burlington had a long prospect of London and the Thames, taken from Southwark, before the fire, and exhibiting the great mansions of the nobility then on the Strand. 2 Vertue thought it the best view he had seen of London. Mr. West has a print of it, but with some alterations. This Wyck painted the Fire of London more than once. In Mr. Halsted's. sale was a Turkish procession, large as life, and Lord Ilchester has a Turkish camp by him. His best pieces were representations of chemists and their laboratories, which Vertue supposed ingeniously were in compliment to the fashion at court, Charles II. and Prince Rupert having each their laboratory. Captain Laroon had the heads of Thomas Wyck and his wife, by Francis Hals. 3 Wyck died in England in 1682. He ought to have been introduced under the reign of Charles II., but was postponed to place him here with his son.

____________________
1
He designed the Seaports of the Mediterranean, and afterwards etched them, on twenty-one plates, with much spirit and in good taste. They are now rare.—D.
2
It is still at Burlington-house, Piccadilly; as is a view of the Parade, with Charles II., his courtiers, and women in masks, walking. The statue of the Gladiator is at the head of the canal.
3
A gentleman informs me that he has nine etchings by Thomas Wyck.

-234-

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