Anecdotes of Painting in England: With Some Account of the Principal Artists - Vol. 2

By Horace Walpole | Go to book overview
Save to active project

husband's portraits by herself. In the Bodleian Library at Oxford, is a picture that she gave to it, which, by a strange mistake, is called Sir Thomas More, though it is evidently a copy of Cromwell, Earl of Essex. Nay, Robert Whitehall, a poetaster, wrote verses to her in 16 74, on her sending this supposed picture of Sir Thomas More. 1

The other arts made no figure in this reign; I scarce find even names of professors.


JOHN BUSHNELL,

(— 1701,)

an admired statuary in his own time, but only memorable to us by a capricious character. He was scholar of Burman, who, having debauched his servant-maid, obliged Bushnell to marry her. The latter, in disgust, left England, stayed two years in France, and from thence went to Italy. He lived some time at Rome and at Venice; in the last city he made a magnificent monument for a Procuratore di San Marco, representing the siege of Candia, and a naval engagement between the Venetians and Turks. He came home through Germany by the way of Hamburg. Some of his first works, after his return, were the statues of Charles I. and II. at the Royal Exchange, and Sir Thomas Gresham there above stairs. His best were the kings, at Temple-bar. He carved several marble monuments, particularly one for Lord Ashburnham, in Sussex; one for Dr. Grew's wife, in Christ-church, London ; one for Lord Thomond, in Northamptonshire; Cowley's 2 and Sir Palmes Fairborn's, in Westminster-abbey, and cut a head of Mr. Talman. He had agreed to complete the set of kings at the Royal Exchange, but hearing that another person (I suppose Cibber) had made interest to carve some of them, Bushnell would not proceed, though he had begun six or seven. Some of his profession asserting that, though he

____________________
1
V. Wood's Athenœ, vol. ii. fol. 786.—Several of the before-mentioned artists seem to have been unnecessarily introduced, and are not to be ranked above mere amateurs.—D.
2
The statue only of John, Lord Mordaunt, in Fulham church, is by him, and is a better specimen of his art.—D.

-239-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Anecdotes of Painting in England: With Some Account of the Principal Artists - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 336

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?