Anecdotes of Painting in England: With Some Account of the Principal Artists - Vol. 2

By Horace Walpole | Go to book overview
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mined that Sir James Thornhill should paint the cupola of St. Paul's. Marco Ricci 1 died at Venice in 1730. 2


BAKER

painted insides of churches, and some of those at Rome. In Mr. Sykes's sale was a view of St. Paul's since it was rebuilt, but with a more splendid altar.


JAMES BOGDANI

was born of a genteel family in Hungary ; his father, a deputy from the states of that country to the emperor. The son was not brought up to the profession, but made considerable progress by the force of his natural abilities. Fruit, flowers, and especially birds were his excellence. Queen Anne bespoke several of his pieces, still in the royal palaces. He was a man of a gentle and fair character, and lived between forty and fifty years in England, known at first only by the name of the Hungarian. He had raised an easy fortune, but being persuaded to make it over to his son, who was going to marry a reputed fortune, who proved no fortune at all, and other misfortunes succeeding, poverty and sickness terminated his life at his house in Great Queen-street. His pictures and goods were sold by auction at his house, the sign of the Golden Eagle, in Great Queen-street, Lincoln's-inn-fields. His son is in the Board of Ordnance, and formerly painted in his father's manner.


WILLIAM CLARET,

(— 1706,)

imitated Sir Peter Lely, from whom he made many copies. There is a print from his picture of John Egerton, Earl of Bridgwater, done as early as 1680. Claret died at his house in Lincoln's-inn-fields, in 1706, and, being a widower, made his housekeeper his heiress.

____________________
1
[The following picture by the two Ricci was sold at the Strawberry-hill sale for 12 guineas. It is thus described in Walpole's Catalogue :—

Rehearsal of an Opera, with caricatures of the principal performers; Nicolini stands in front, Mrs. Toft is at the harpsichord, Margarita is entering, in black. The gentleman in blue, with a patch on one eye, sitting by the Margarita, is Sir Robert Rich, father of Elizabeth, Lady Lyttelton. The landscape in this picture is by Marco Ricci. It was purchased at the sale of the property of John, Duke of Argyle, who bought it at that of Charles Stanhope, Esq.—W.]

2
[1729. Zanetti, Della Pittura Veneziena, &c.—W.]

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