Anecdotes of Painting in England: With Some Account of the Principal Artists - Vol. 2

By Horace Walpole | Go to book overview

he was buried in the churchyard of St. Martin's-in-the- Fields.

John Laguerre, the son, had talents for painting, but wanted application, preferring the stage to more laborious studies. After quitting that profession, I think he painted scenes, and published a set of prints of Hob in the Well, which had a great sale, but he died at last in indigent circumstances in March, 1748.


MICHAEL DAHL,

(1656—1743,)

was born at Stockholm, and received some instructions from Ernstraen Klocke, an esteemed artist in that country, and painter to the crown, who, in the early part of his life, had been in England. At the age of twenty-two, Dahl was brought over by Mr. Pouters, a merchant, who, five years afterwards, introduced Boit from the same country. After a year's residence here, Dahl continued his travels in search of improvement, stayed about a year at Paris, and bestowed about three more on the principal cities in Italy. At Rome he painted the portrait of P. F. Garroli, a sculptor and architect, under whom Gibbs studied for some time. But it was more flattering to Dahl to be employed by one that had been his sovereign, the famous Queen Christina. As he worked on her picture, she asked what he intended she should hold in her hand? He replied, "A fan." Her majesty, whose ejaculations were rarely delicate, vented a very gross one, and added, " A fan! give me a lion ; that is fitter for the Queen of Sweden." I repeat this, without any intention of approving it. It was a pedantic affectation of spirit in a woman who had quitted a crown to ramble over Europe in a motley kind of masculine masquerade, assuming the right of assassinating her gallants, as if tyranny as well as the priesthood were an indelible character, and throwing herself for protection into the bosom of a Church she laughed at, for the comfortable enjoyment of talking indecently with learned men, and of living so with any other men. Contemptible in her ambition by abandoning the happiest

-264-

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