Anecdotes of Painting in England: With Some Account of the Principal Artists - Vol. 2

By Horace Walpole | Go to book overview

by one Andrea, a disciple of Thornhill, who died about the same time at Paris.


ROBERT BROWN

was a disciple of Thornhill, and worked under him on the cupola of St. Paul's. 1 Setting up for himself, he was much employed in decorating several churches in the city, being admired for his skill in painting crimson curtains, apostles, and stories out of the New Testament. He painted the altar-piece of St. Andrew Undershaft, and the spaces between the Gothic arches in chiaro-scuro. In the parish church of St. Botolph, Aldgate, he painted the transfiguration for the altar; in St. Andrew's, Holborn, the figures of St. Andrew and St. John, and two histories on the sides of the organ. In the chapel of St. John, at the end of Bedford-row, he painted St. John the Baptist and St. John the Evangelist, and even two signs that were much admired, that for the Paul's-head tavern in Cateaton-street, and the Baptist's-head at the corner of Aldermanbury. Correggio's sign of the Muleteer is mentioned by all his biographers. Brown, I doubt, was no Correggio.


[ANTONIO] BELLUCCI,

(1654—1726,) 2

an Italian painter of history, arrived here in 1716, from the court of the Elector Palatine. In 1722 he finished a ceiling at Buckingham-house, for which the Duchess paid him 500l. He was also employed on the chapel of Canons, that large and costly palace of the Duke of Chandos which, by a fate as transient as its founder's, barely survived him,

____________________
1
Highmore relates an anecdote of Brown, when engaged with Thornhill in this undertaking. They worked together upon a scaffold, which was an open one. Thornhill had just completed the head of the apostle, and was retiring backwards in order to survey the effect, heedless of the imminent danger. As lie had just reached the edge, Brown, not having time to warn him, snatched up a pencil, full of colour, and dashed it upon the face. Thornhill, enraged, ran hastily forward, exclaiming, " Good God! what have you done? " "I have only saved your life!" was the satisfactory reply.—D.
2
[This Venetian painter was born at Pieve di Soligo, near Treviso. Lanzi notices his visit to various places in Germany, but does not mention his journey to England. He died in his native place.—W.]

-283-

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