Anecdotes of Painting in England: With Some Account of the Principal Artists - Vol. 2

By Horace Walpole | Go to book overview
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in St. Anne's parish, January 21, 1748, aged forty-two, and left a wife and a numerous young family. 1 Slater painted in the same kind with Nollekins, and executed ceilings and works in fresco at Stowe and at the Earl of Westmoreland's at Mereworth in Kent.


ROBINSON,

a young painter from Bath, had been educated under Vanderbank, but marrying a wife with four or five thousand pounds, and taking the house in Cleveland-court in which Jervas had lived, he suddenly came into great business, though his colouring was faint and feeble. He affected to dress all his pictures in Vandyck's habits ; a fantastic fashion with which the age was pleased in other painters too, and which, could they be taken for the works of that great man, would only serve to perplex posterity. Vanaken assisted to give some credit to the delusion. Robinson died when he was not above thirty, in 1745.


ANDRÉA SOLDI,

of Florence, arrived in 1735, being then about the age of thirty-three. He had been to visit the Holy Land, and at Aleppo having drawn the pictures of some English merchants, they gave him recommendations to their countrymen. For some time he had much business, and painted both portraits and history, but outlived his income and fell into misfortunes. 2


CHEVALIER RUSCA,

a Milanese, came over in 1738, and painted a few pictures here in a gaudy fluttering style, but with some merit. I think he stayed here but very few years.

____________________
1
Of this numerous family, one at least was most fortunate; and he probably survived them all. This was Joseph Nollekens, R. A., a sculptor of distinguished talent, and whose numerous busts are admirable for resemblance and execution. Great employment, during a long life, with a love of accumulation, enabled him to bequeath, at his death, a sum exceeding 100,000l.—D. [J. F. Nollekens was born at Antwerp, in 1702, and came to this country in 1733, and was buried at Paddington, in 1747. He left five children by his wife, Mary Anne Le Sacq. See Smith's Nollekens and his Times, London, 1828.—W.]
2
[He was a member of the Chartered Society of Artists, and was still living in 1766. See Edwards's Anecdotes, &c.—W.]

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