Anecdotes of Painting in England: With Some Account of the Principal Artists - Vol. 2

By Horace Walpole | Go to book overview
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STEPHEN SLAUGHTER

(— 1765,)

succeeded Mr. Walton as supervisor of the king's pictures, and had been for some time in Ireland, where he painted several portraits. He had a sister that excelled in imitating bronzes and bas-reliefs to the highest degree of deception. He died at Kensington, whither he had retired, May 15, 1765. He was succeeded in his office of surveyor and keeper of the pictures by Mr. George Knapton, painter in crayons. 1


JAMES WORSDALE

would have been little known had he been distinguished by no talents but his pencil. He was apprenticed to Sir Godfrey Kneller, but marrying his wife's niece without their consent, was dismissed by his master. On the reputation, however, of that education, by his singing, excellent mimicry, and facetious spirit, he gained many patrons and business, and was appointed master-painter to the Board of Ordnance. He published 2 several small pieces, songs, &c., besides the following dramatic performances:—

1. A Cure for a Scold, a ballad opera, taken from Shakespeare's 'Taming of a Shrew.' 2. The Assembly, a farce ; in which Mr. Worsdale himself played the part of old Lady Scandal admirably well. 3. The Queen of Spain. 4. The Extravagant Justice.

He died June 13, 1767, and was buried at St. Paul's, Covent-garden, with this epitaph composed by himself—

"Eager to get, but not to keep the pelf,
A friend to all mankind, except himself."


RANELAGH BARRETT

(— 1768,)

was a noted copyist, who being countenanced by Sir Robert Walpole, copied several of his collection, and others of the Duke of Devonshire and Dr. Meade. He was indefatigable, and executed a vast number of works. He succeeded greatly

____________________
1
[A three-quarter length by Slaughter, of Sir Edward, second son of Sir Robert Walpole and Catherine Shooter, was bought at the Strawberry-hill sale, by Earl Waldegrave, for 10 guineas.—W.]
2
Vide Baker's Companion to the Playhouse.

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